http://havanajournal.com/politics/entry/cuban_anti_cancer_medicines_awaiting_treasury_department_license/

HavanaJournal.com: Cuba Politics

Cuban anti-cancer medicines awaiting Treasury Department license

Posted April 21, 2004 by publisher in Cuba Politics.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

BY RAISA PAGES | [url=http://www.granma.cu]http://www.granma.cu[/url]

A group of cancer treatment products such as monoclonal antibodies and therapeutic vaccines manufactured in the Cuban Molecular Immunology Center are awaiting a Treasury Department license to be utilized in the United States by a Californian company.

This information emerged during a lecture by Carlos Borroto, deputy director of the Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Center (CIGB), in the first round of the Cuba-U.S. business negotiations 2004, underway since Tuesday in Havana’s International Conference center.

Pedro Alvarez, president of the Cuban Alimport company, informed Granma International that a contract worth $10 million had been signed with a California company to acquire rice, powdered milk and other food products, in their majority aimed at covering the need for foodstuffs sold by the state on the subsidized ration system.

Alvarez noted that on this occasion more than 400 businesspeople from 172 companies in 30 U.S. states have arrived for the session.

The Alimport director announced that imports of chicken to the island from U.S. states that have not been caught up in the bird flu outbreak are to be reestablished. For now, the exporters are to make good on the shortfall of a 20,000-ton contract.

Alvarez stated that imports of cattle from the United States had been provisionally halted until visas are conceded by the Cuban veterinary authorities after inspecting the state of the herds.

Political figures attending this trade meeting include three congress representatives: C.L. Otter, Republican, Idaho; and Loretta and Linda Sánchez, Democrats from California.

Also here in Havana are Brian E. Dubie, vice governor of Vermont; Ron Sparks, Alabama agriculture and industry commissioner; and Terry Coleman, president of the Georgia House of Representatives.

The Vermont vice governor informed Granma International that the state could export milk, dairy cattle, cheese, timber products and apples. If trade restrictions were lifted, they would be interested in training nurses on the island, as there is a nationwide shortage of such personnel. They would also like to purchase oranges, plantain and coffee from Cuba.

Mr. “Butch” Oliver of Idaho told us that many people in his state are interested in establishing relations with Cuba and in the blockade being lifted. Idaho could offer meat, potatoes and milk and import Cuban rum and cigars, among many other products.

Gary Sebree, the manager of the Rice Federation; and Jay S. Brickman, vice president of Crowley Liner Services, one of the largest shipping companies in the world; and María Conchita Mendez, a Cuban-American businesswoman from the Alabama, also spoke at yesterday’s session.

Brickman noted that in the battle to get rid of the current trade restrictions on Cuba, it is the U.S. states that have the leadership, something that should be the role of the national authorities.

Today’s events include details of business opportunities for oil prospecting in Cuba, and the signing of various food contracts.

Since the United States has permitted food sales to Cuba the island has acquired 2,564,574 tons of products at a value of $644,000,600.

The states most represented in this first trade round of 2004 are Florida, Texas, Georgia, California, Alabama and Idaho.

Member Comments

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On April 21, 2004, publisher wrote:

I’m afraid that Americans will have to wait a bit longer for monoclonal antibodies and therapeutic vaccines from Cuba.

Why? Oh yeah, the Cuban government is like communist China.

Hmmm, I don’t think we have any trade embargo against China.