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Posted July 26, 2010 by publisher in Castro's Cuba

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Rob Sequin | Havana Journal

For Cuba watchers, July 26 has a special meaning.

This is the day 57 years ago that Fidel Castro and all his brainwashed subordinates attacked the Moncada barracks marking what would be the Revolution that would enslave Cuba for decades.

Now in 2010 Fidel’s business model is a complete failure yet some people still believe in/are hypnotized by the bullshit.

Today Cuba is such a mess that the President nor the former President have enough balls or courage or support to even SPEAK at the anniversary of the Revolution. How much shame can they live with oppressing the Cuban people?

Associated Press

At least there is some free press in Cuba… American press and Paul Haven is doing a good job summing up the current events…

SANTA CLARA, Cuba — A B-team of socialist speakers spent Cuba’s Revolution Day bashing the United States for everything from its drug consumption to the war in Iraq to its military support for Colombia, portraying Washington as the great villain in world affairs.

But the day was more notable for who didn’t address the crowd — President Raul Castro never took the lectern, brother Fidel Castro was a no-show and Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez canceled his trip to Cuba altogether. It was the first Revolution Day in memory in which neither Castro spoke, leaving some in the crowd and on Cuba’s streets disappointed and perplexed. No reason was given.

The Castros often use July 26 — the most important date on Cuba’s calendar — to set the agenda for the coming year and announce major changes. A spate of public appearances by the 83-year-old Fidel after years of seclusion had fueled speculation he would be onstage with his younger brother and possibly even address his compatriots.

READ THE REST OF THE STORY HERE

END

Apparently Raul was having too much of a good time to bother with addressing the Cuban people.

What a mess. He’s going to have to do more than release political prisoners to save his job.

  1. Follow up post #1 added on July 27, 2010 by nacho with 111 total posts

    I find it disgusting that the president of the country couldn’t be bothered to speak.
    Frankly I don’t know what to make of it, Raul is a man of few words and less speeches but this takes the cake.
    Maybe he knew everyone is expecting promises/reforms/changes and he doesn’t have any so he better kept his mouth shut???? 
    Was he not happy with a) fidel is back with a vengeance and/or b) chavez didn’t show up? I doubt b) is the answer.
    Why did they give José Ramón Machado Ventura the microphone? Maybe a last shot at fame before he dies?
    What with the whole Cuba - Venezuela “new economic union”?
    More questions that answers, oh well.


  2. Follow up post #2 added on July 27, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    You guys slay me. Any opportunity to take a potshot at the Cuban government.. what a riot.  Rob, you wrote “This is the day 57 years ago that Fidel Castro and all his brainwashed subordinates attacked the Moncada barracks…”  That’s a pretty sad way to phrase things, amigo. Regardless of your opinion of the Revolution post-1959, the ‘53 attack on Moncada was the beginning of the end for Batista. The resistance was striking out at a corrupt, murderous regime… people acting to liberate their country from a U.S. puppet.  And you call them “brainwashed”?

    Letting ideology affect your historical perspective, eh?


  3. Follow up post #3 added on July 27, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    And now the Revolution is a corrupt, murderous regime.

    Funny you fail to admit that.



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  4. Follow up post #4 added on July 27, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    Is there corruption in the Cuban government? Absolutely. As there is in the U.S. government, the Canadian government, the Mexican government, etc. ad infinitum. Your point?

    Murderous? No. Quite the opposite, in fact, despite the wingnut theories and blame levied upon Cuba for everything under the sun. I mean, jeepers, if a guy falls out of a coconut tree in Matanzas, you guys would say Castro killed him with his bare hands.


  5. Follow up post #5 added on July 27, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Right. Fidel’s regime never killed anyone except those who had it coming to them like Colonel Rojas and thousands like him.

    Let’s not change the subject. No one is running Cuba. It’s a failed state and has been for years, decades even.



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  6. Follow up post #6 added on July 27, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    The current detention in Cuba of a young Canadian, after being involved in a traffic accident which appears to have been not his fault, is iniquitous.

    To Canadians, my advice is, go somewhere else. The assholes that run the Cuban system have lost it. They need Canadian tourists, then they stick it to them. They live in a parallel universe.


  7. Follow up post #7 added on July 27, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    The Castro regime is about to collapse, finally and thank God. I hope it will not be too dirty.

    Expect an attempt at a military takeover. That’s the problem.


  8. Follow up post #8 added on July 27, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    You may want to revisit the facts on that one, bub. The Canadian was not of legal age to drive under the rental agreement for the car.  Given the unlikelihood of foreigners involved in accidents returning to Cuba if called to trial, one can understand Cuba’s desire to keep them on hand until the juridical process is complete.  I have no idea how that kid’s mother thought that a teenage driver should be at the wheel in a country they are visiting for the first time, and likely have no first-hand knowledge of local driving conditions.  An article in the Toronto Sun (http://www.torontosun.com/news/torontoandgta/2010/07/25/14824771.html) notes “Cuban law dictates accidents be treated as a crime when a tourist is driving and a local is seriously hurt.”

    Just because Cuba “needs” Canadian tourists, doesn’t mean they should place said tourists above the law.


  9. Follow up post #9 added on July 27, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    I read the article in the Toronto Star and I have my reservations about the “facts” provided by the Star. You should try and be a little less brainwashed by the mainstream media. And my name is not “bub;” we try to treat people with respect on this Forum.

    I did not say the man is not guilty of whatever, - noting that he probably is not guilty of any offence.  I said that his forced detention in Cuba was unreasonable, and probably a violation of his international human rights. You obviously do not understand Cuban law. READ my posting before commenting.

    Before lecturing me on Cuban law, know that I live in Cuba. And I know that this exercise is no more that a money grab by the Casto government. It happens all the time.

    And know that I warn Canadian tourists about this problem.

    >P.S. Have you ever lived in Cuba?


  10. Follow up post #10 added on July 27, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    Rogdix, the general facts as they are presented the article and which were cited / are relevant to this discussion are corroborated by several other mainstream media reports. One would never accuse me of being “brainwashed” by the MMS, as I am a critical consumer of news from a variety of sources, and at one point in my adult life spent a decade as a reporter / newsreader in Canada.

    Great that you live in Cuba. I’d love to hear the particulars of your situation, for context.

    Yes, I’ve lived in Cuba during my MA fieldwork, investigating Cuba’s experiences in computing networks and training. I’ve been from one end to the other, the mountains and the valleys, and I speak fluent Spanish. I’ve been an (at least) annual visitor to the island, and have set foot on a “resort” once, in 1994, with a group of students. I have extensive networks of friends and colleagues on the island, most cuban and a few ex-pat.  As much as a non-Cuban can, I believe I can say that I “know” Cuba, though I would never call myself an expert (and anyone who does is deluded).

    Looking forward to further exchanges, if Publisher allows me to stick around wink


  11. Follow up post #11 added on July 27, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Your comments are much appreciated. As I said, my issue is not with guilty or not guilty, - but rather methods of detention.

    Anyway, give me time to look more closely at your comments. I look forward to further communication. (As you may have noticed, I’m in Canada at the moment.)


  12. Follow up post #12 added on July 28, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Thanks but let’s stay on topic that no one is running Cuba.



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  13. Follow up post #13 added on July 31, 2010 by jmw1 with 62 total posts

    It appears most have lost interest in who was controlling Cuba, and perhaps more focused on who may be in control after the Berlin falls again.


  14. Follow up post #14 added on July 31, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    Marek (comments ## 2 and 4):

    See the publisher’s comments to another AP story about Cuba (by the same Paul Haven – this time the news is that Fidel Castro agrees with most other serious observers that Obama’s health care reform is a major victory for Obama’s presidency)  http://havanajournal.com/politics/entry/fidel-castro-loves-obamacare-325/, posted March 25:

    “I voted for Obama but ... Obama is way too far to the left on healthcare and I think LOTS of Democrats are going to be voted out of office in November because they are WAY out of touch with the American public.”

    In other words: “I voted for Obama, but I will not do it again, because I am against the health care reform.” Now, the health care reform was a key issue in Obama’s campaign, but apparently took the publisher by surprise after the election. I think this gives an eloquent indication of the publisher’s capability for political analysis and an explanation of the general intellectual level of his comments.


  15. Follow up post #15 added on August 01, 2010 by jmw1 with 62 total posts

    In the Obama administration we have advisors, bureaucrats and czars without a lick of practical business experience.  The president himself lacks any business experience.  He was a community organizer finagling government grants.  He’s surrounded by career politicians, union bosses and government officials that never worked a day in the private sector.  None of them have ever made a payroll, created a dime of wealth or produced anything.  They never made a profit, served customers, innovated a service, marketed a product or sold anything.  Business is foreign to them.

    In actuality they are all antagonistic towards free enterprise.  Like Lenin they think business success is a matter of luck.  They don’t see consumers as the kings and queens of the market whose buying choices determine which businesses succeed or fail.  They see consumers as victims.  Listen to the president talk about the insurance companies or drug companies or the oil companies.  He infers that they are predators taking advantage of naïve consumers.  He insists his ideas on how to punish them, control them and take their money must be heeded.  These attitudes permeate Washington.  They are more socialist than capitalist.

    Now these denizens of the ivory towers, devoid of the entrepreneurial skills necessary to make a buck are charged with turning the world economy around.  They don’t have a clue about creating jobs. They’ve subsidized a flock of losing technologies rather than let the market sort out the winners and losers.  They’ve spent our money on make work jobs of no lasting value.  They have an arrogance that they know best.  However, their liberal socialist schemes have not worked nor will they ever work.


  16. Follow up post #16 added on August 01, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Agree but let’s stay on topic. Thanks.



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  17. Follow up post #17 added on August 01, 2010 by jmw1 with 62 total posts

    Who’s running Cuba?
    The Castro brothers.
    They have successfully run it into the ground.


  18. Follow up post #18 added on August 06, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    OK Pub, I respect your reminders about staying on topic.

    Now why don’t you take the initiative of perhaps instigating a forum on which we CAN delineate the current on-the-ground crap being promulgated by the walking fossils Castro. Like the detention of the young Canadian feller due to a traffic accident that was clearly not his fault. And to use your forum to issue warnings. Not neo-political pontifications, - but warnings about the reality and dangers of Cuba today, right now.

    OK, I’m Canadian, and maybe you have some difficulty in dealing with the fact that Canadians have more current insight into Cuba than do most Americans. That’s inevitable, we go there regularly.

    Start a Canadian forum, Eh?


  19. Follow up post #19 added on August 09, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    In order of importance and only my opinion;

    Who/what is running Cuba?

    1. The gray/black Market
    2. Raul Castro
    3. Fidel Castro

    Until no. 1 is removed or minimized, there is little hope for the rest.


  20. Follow up post #20 added on August 09, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Gallofino:

    “1. The gray/black Market
    2. Raul Castro
    3. Fidel Castro

    Until no. 1 is removed or minimized, there is little hope for the rest.”

    Didn’t you intend to say, “Until No’s 2 and 3 are removed….......?”


  21. Follow up post #21 added on August 09, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    No, I meant what I said.  The most powerful market force in Cuba for decades now (even in Soviet times) was and is the black/gray market.  All at the expense to the Cuban government…  Try to run a business never mind a country when up to 40% of your products are being “diverted”.


  22. Follow up post #22 added on August 09, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Gallofino,

    Are you just trying to pick a fight?

    You are saying the Cuban people are responsible for the failure of the Cuban economy?

    Wow.

    You must really hate capitalism.

    Here’s a story for you. Years ago I was watching a documentary from a French production company that followed a piano tuner to Cuba. This French guy goes to Cuba to tune pianos for music schools for free. Great. Good for him.

    Have way into the documentary he complains about the US Embargo because there are no piano strings in Cuba.

    Think about it.

    1. Why doesn’t he bring piano strings from France?

    2. Why doesn’t he open a store in Cuba to sell piano strings?

    3. What the hell does this have to do with the US Embargo?

    Answer: Fidel Castro will not allow ANYONE to open a store to sell piano strings.

    But I digress. Back to the topic… Who’s running Cuba? No one.



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  23. Follow up post #23 added on August 10, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    Publisher,

    Do you know what a gallofino is?  Despite that I am not picking a fight.  Rather, I am imparting some reality.  I read and re-read my earlier contributions and am at a loss as to how you would qualify me as anti-capitalist.  I am unashamedly capitalist and also understand what uncontrolled capitalism can do.  I guess we all can nowadays.

    Using your example of piano strings.  Its a good one.  There is lots of demand.  But how would you know that unless you had dozens of contacts that repair pianos in Cuba and access to that market?  What modality, what law exists that you can take a dozen or so and purvey the material to them?  None unless you are selling to the state.  Which in turn resells to the repair man who in turn resells to the customer, minus whatever is diverted t the gray/black market.  Not too may Cubans own pianos but the example fits.  Unless you have a market with the right conditions to move your merchandise, you have nothing.  Are you going to rely on some peon that gets $18.00 per month to take care of your interests? 

    So my challenge to you and whomever disagrees with this is to come up with a coherent argument as to what/who is running Cuba other than the gray/black market.

    Here is the list again:

    1. The gray/black Market
    2. Raul Castro
    3. Fidel Castro

    Behind them there are 11 million people.  No matter which of them you put in 2nd, 3rd and so on, until number one is properly addressed, controlled and reduced to a tertiary option, it is the gray/black market that controls Cuba.


  24. Follow up post #24 added on August 10, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Your thinking is irrational.

    The black market is a RESULT of the Castro government.

    If Fidel wanted to change the laws (I say Fidel because I’m not sure Raul has much power) to allow a free market then the black market would disappear.

    But people like you never blame Fidel for anything so there is no understanding of the real world by you people.



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  25. Follow up post #25 added on August 10, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    Has the black market disappeared from your neck of the woods?  Are the Castro’s responsible your local drug trade and the maybe illegal cigarettes and booze?  Stolen merchandise being fenced? People woring under the table and not declaring income?  Or is it a reality we all face?  The difference in Cuba is that EVERYONE has almost daily contact with the gray/black market.  Therefore it rules the country, the economy and the “leaders” we all rant about.

    You asked who rules Cuba.  I say its the gray/black market because I have lived it for years and years.  No politician, local, provincial or federal has the influence and can provide the “prosperity” of this particular entity.  No one because its EVERYONE.  Understand that if you are given an untenable circumstance where you live, you can’t leave and have a family to feed, the master (ruler) is ANYTHING that can put food on the table.  Where you are, you may take the risk of opening a business.  They cannot.  So they have ONE master and its neither #2 or 3…


  26. Follow up post #26 added on August 10, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Pub:

    Assuming Gallofino is for real, - his arguments are totally circular and illogical. He has a problem with the relative positioning of carts and horses.

    Anyone out there with something more constructive to say?


  27. Follow up post #27 added on August 10, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    rogdix,

    You live in Cuba half of the year?  What entity from the list do you have more contact with?  Who/what rules your day to day in Cuba?  Raul of Fidel on the news?


  28. Follow up post #28 added on August 10, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I know. It’s sad on so many levels.

    Fidel is a man of the people right Gallofino? Yet he keeps his people oppressed for 50 years and you blame the black market on the Cuban people?

    Just bizarre. You’re not really too good at the propaganda. Are you just starting out working for Fidel?



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  29. Follow up post #29 added on August 10, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    Really, you guys must be reading between the lines and coming up with your own insecurities.  You don’t believe me so ad hominem accusations are NOT an answer to any of my questions.  They are accusations without base.  I am Canadian and I do business all over the globe.  I lived in Cuba for years full time and DO NOT support the role of government to this day.  You say “no one”,  I say the gray/black market.  What is so difficult to understand about this?  After all, it has to be something/someone, no?

    Who rules Canada?  To a limit, BUSINESS rules Canada.  Where is the business in Cuba?  In the hands of the state, not the people.  Only despite massive (undeclared) resources the state cannot control the gray/black market.  Not by a long shot.  So, who/what rules Cuba then?  Can you compose an answer that is not an insult?  Can you answer my questions?


  30. Follow up post #30 added on August 10, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Don’t cut me off for this Pub, but I have reluctantly concluded that the area of greatest unemployment this side of the Mississipi (spelling) is the region between his ears.


  31. Follow up post #31 added on August 10, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    rogdix,

    I asked some specific questions of you, yet you prefer to attack my gray matter rather than to pose simple answers.  So you live half the year in Cuba, make your way there but cannot answer ONE of the questions I pose?  were and what are your answers?


  32. Follow up post #32 added on August 10, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    “Can you compose an answer that is not an insult? “

    Can you make an argument that is not insulting?

    You Communists hate all Capitalism so there is no way to have a rational discussion with you.

    Then, as we have seen hundreds of times before on this site, when you Communists are pressed on the truth you change the subject.

    So, enough with these comments.

    You made your point, evil Capitalism is in charge in Cuba and that’s because the Cuban people are weak, stupid, uneducated etc etc but of course has nothing to do with Fidel.

    We get it.

    You made your point.



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  33. Follow up post #33 added on August 11, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    Well, no.  Not at all my point, Pub.  Whatever floats you boat, though.  How are my questions insulting?  What subject have I changed?  All I have posed is an argument that the gray/black market rules Cuba more so than Raul, Fidel or any PERSON.  It is an entity beyond their control despite the massive resources they have thrown at it to control it.  You asked… 

    And your reaction makes you look paranoid and perhaps some of the mud you are slinging at me is best hurled back at you, but I digress.  It is after all your sand box…

    And rogdix?  Any answers from you?


  34. Follow up post #34 added on August 13, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    More speculation on Fidel’s reappearance and his relationship with (power over) Raul.



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  35. Follow up post #35 added on August 13, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    This is hilarious. Three people, all who are declared critics in opposition of the existing Cuban government, arguing over nothing.  You guys should start a stand-up act… :D


  36. Follow up post #36 added on August 13, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    And now there are four.

    Did it cross YOUR mind, in your innate wisdom and perspicacity, that a constructive comment may be appreciated?


  37. Follow up post #37 added on August 13, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    Hah! On THIS website?  “Constructive” or “reasoned” comments are ridiculed. This is not a forum for intelligent discussion, but rather ideological rantings. I don’t come here because you guys provide insightful commentary… it’s all entertainment. Sort of like watching a Cohen Brothers film.  Total insanity.


  38. Follow up post #38 added on August 13, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Then why don’t YOU provide some insightful commentary?


  39. Follow up post #39 added on August 13, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    See Post #37, line 1.


  40. Follow up post #40 added on August 16, 2010 by gallofino with 20 total posts

    Marek, little need for that.  The silence of the Publisher and rogdix in terms of the questions I posed is more than ample evidence that you have a solid point…


  41. Follow up post #41 added on August 17, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    ”Arguing over nothing” – Marek (comment # 35) is more right, than he may be aware. For the whole AP-story is only a piece of trivial day-to-day journalism, and not worth debate: Raul Castro most probably left the rostrum of the commemoration act to his second in command, because he was to give a major speech on legislative issues to the session of National Assembly the following day – all transmitted by TV. Nothing more natural. And no sign whatsoever that Fidel Castro is taking more part in government affairs than former presidents in other countries. Typical day-to-day journalism: Invent a sensation, where there is none.


  42. Follow up post #42 added on August 19, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    There is a total political limbo in Cuba: Fidel Castro playing to big boss receiving Cuban Doctors returning from Bolivia and Raul with his head between his legs trying people to forget that officially he is in charge.
    I guess the natural solution would solve these matters one way or another.


  43. Follow up post #43 added on August 19, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    Yeyo: Then come up with better evidence than who is presiding a welcome ceremony. Fidel Castro’s recovery may have increased his informal influence on government affairs (a phenomenon not unknown, especially in Latin America), but we know nothing about it.


  44. Follow up post #44 added on August 19, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    Even when on his convalescent bed Fidel Castro’s ghost have been all over every single Raul’s decisions. No single decision in Cuba is taken without Fidel’s ok. There is no need for more evidence.
    Cubans know that very well, that is a fact of the life in Cuba for the last 52 years.


  45. Follow up post #45 added on August 19, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    There’s no doubt about that Yeyo, and nothing will change until the walking fossil pops his clogs.

    From what I’ve observed, I strongly suspect that the Military - Police are very much at the ready behind the scenes. They seem to be the only unified group in Cuba at this time, capable of doing anything.

    Come to reflect on it, - the military-police complex has been the only uinified group in Cuba for years.


  46. Follow up post #46 added on August 19, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    In my humble opinion there are only two unified things in Cuba: Fidel Castro and fear.
    I guess we will have to wait and see what happens when Fidel is gone. But again I do not feel that the military or the police are unified to hold things like they are in place.

    Things have change a lot lately and everybody loves the US currency, even the FAR and MININT generals are all fighting between them for control and positions on the companies dealing with tourism and foreigners because those are the positions where they can access the dollar.

    That beautiful idea of “everybody is the same” country that Castro sold to the world while exploiting his own people and which some western lefties have dreamed of would change dramatically once Fidel Castro is not in the picture, not because of the US or European Union but for his own weight.

    The Cuban people are sick and tired of being sick and tired.


  47. Follow up post #47 added on August 19, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    “The Cuban people are sick and tired of being sick and tired.” They certainly are. And yes, you’re right about the lust for divisa among the Cuban power brokers.

    Following through with this, I do still sense that the military is already into creaming off the foreign currencies, divisa. And by the way, I didn’t intend to convey that the military-police complex would hold things “like they are” in place. Rather I was suggesting that the complex (for want of a better word) would lay the initial groundwork for the way things are going to be.


  48. Follow up post #48 added on August 20, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    Yeyo (comment # 44): Your statement that “[Fidel Castro’s] ghost has been all over every single of Raul’s decisions” contradicts Brian Latell (Havana Journal August 4): “He, along with some family members and hard-line fidelista allies, probably have concluded that many of Raul’s recent initiatives have undermined Fidel’s historic legitimacy. All of the limited reforms of the last two years have been designed, after all, to rectify the grivous economic problems that Fidel bequeathed his successors. ... The grim diagnosis of Cuba’s dysfunction that Raul laid out in a major speech last april must have deeply antagonized Fidel and his associates.”

    You even declare that there is no need for more evidence to support your view – you must then dispose of evidence which Mr. Latell is not aware of (neither am I).


  49. Follow up post #49 added on August 21, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Miquel:

    You know what, I have read your last post #48 over and over, and I cannot work out what point you are trying to make. You seem to be all over the place. Maybe English is not your first language, - that’s OK, we can accommodate that.

    However, could you try again and be more definitive?

    No offence intended, and call me stupid if you wish, - but I still don’t understand what you are trying to say.


  50. Follow up post #50 added on August 22, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    rogdix (# 49):
    Thank you for your question. What I tried to show is:
    1) Yeyo believes that Raul Castro has not been able to make one political decision without Fidel Castro’s approval.
    2) Brian Latell believes that Raul Castro took a set of decisions which Fidel Castro does not approve of.
    They cannot both be right. I believe that both views are essentially based on suppositions, and that we know nothing with certainty


  51. Follow up post #51 added on August 22, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    Miguel: I respect Mr. Latell a lot and understand your question. I do have the best of the evidences, which fortunately I can share with you here. That is the knowledge that only comes with experiencing things directly by yourself, and not digesting intelligence reports fed by others. My evidence is the experience of my live in Cuba, working in different positions with the Cuban government which by the way is nothing out of the ordinary because in Cuba everything belongs to the government and therefore most Cubans work for the Cuban government.


  52. Follow up post #52 added on August 23, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    But Yeyo, you did not work in Cuba under Raul Castro’s government!

    You apparently only infer from your experience with Fidel Castro’s self-willed style of leadership, when he was government leader. You may be right, but it is only a supposition.


  53. Follow up post #53 added on August 24, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    Miguel. I recently visited Cuba, where I still have lots of family and friends on several positions within the Military and the Government.
    Nothing has change except for the worst, Fidel Castro continues ruling Cuba. Every single Raul decision is approved by Fidel.
    Raul Castro is a drunken puppet.
    Even before, there were several decisions taken that people gossiped that came directly from Raul as the farmers markets. Still the decisions were approved by Fidel.
    In my opinion nothing would change until Fidel Castro goes somewhere else.


  54. Follow up post #54 added on August 24, 2010 by Marek with 49 total posts

    I continue to be fascinated by the dichotomy of the all-knowing, all-powerful Fidel so many of you offer as the bogey man of Cuba, contrasted with the doddering, alzheimer’s-ridden relic of history portrayed by the very same people.  Talk about split personalities! You guys could use a little consistency… smile


  55. Follow up post #55 added on August 24, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Fidel could whisper something from his death bed and Raul would take action.

    So, it is consistent to argue that Fidel could be mentally challenged yet still in control of Cuba.



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  56. Follow up post #56 added on August 25, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    Sad, but you actually put it very well, the all-powerful Fidel Castro, doddering, Alzheimer’s-ridden relic of history, all in one, is the same monster that after 50 years continue oppressing the Cuban people.
    Nothing has changed or would change in Cuba until he is gone.
    I guess we would have to wait and see…


  57. Follow up post #57 added on August 25, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    Yeyo (# 56): Do you also know from your high-ranking government sources that Fidel Castro does have Alzheimer? “Apparently he has not” (http://havanajournal.com/politics/entry/does-fidel-castro-have-alzheimers-disease-711a/ Havana Journal July 12, Publisher’s comment # 5), and you were not yet informed about it August 7, when you wrote your comment # 15 to the same article.

    The Publisher seems to have a separate view of the relationship between the Castro brothers: A kind of unlimited devotion on part of Raul, who would execute even “what Fidel would whisper from his death bed”.

    So I dare repeat: We know nothing, there are only futile speculations.


  58. Follow up post #58 added on August 25, 2010 by rogdix with 30 total posts

    Tend to agree with Miquel regarding speculations, but we don’t really have anything else at this time do we? And no, Fidel does not show signs of Alzheimers.

    I’m told that even the foreign diplomatic corps in Havana can’t place an interpretation on things right now.

    On the other hand, speculations are not necessarily futile; sometimes they hit the mark, so here’s another one. I don’t think Raoul is in any way a “slave” of big brother. I think he’s sh-t scared of him. Fidel does appear to have his own (paid off) National Guard - for want of a better description.

    I may have this wrong, but didn’t Fidel execute one of his cousins some years ago, for being involved in drug shipments?


  59. Follow up post #59 added on August 26, 2010 by Yeyo with 411 total posts

    Miguel, read my post # 15 better.
    I said: What is the different if Fidel Castro is lucid, decrepit or has Alzheimer? the fact is that he is 84 years old and had been in power for over 50 years oppressing a country.
    It is time for him to go, wherever he wants to go, and to allow the Cuban people to have certain hope in the future after him.


  60. Follow up post #60 added on August 30, 2010 by miguel with 41 total posts

    Yeyo: I referred to your comment # 15, because I could not avoid reading it as an effort to minimize the damage caused to the Publisher’s credibility by his Alzheimer story.

    I’m well aware that you simply made a slip in your comment # 56 above taking up the wording of Marek’s sarcastic comment # 54, but the joke was too tempting. Please excuse me.


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