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Posted August 23, 2004 by publisher in US Embargo

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Associated Press

The Bush administration has successfully overcome Cuban jamming of U.S. government radio and television broadcasts through transmission from a military aircraft, the State Department said Monday.
Spokesman Adam Ereli said the transmissions of Miami-based Radio and TV Marti took place for several hours on Saturday from an aircraft flown by the Air National Guard.

Ereli noted that a U.S. government commission appointed by President Bush (news - web sites) had recommended in May that regular broadcasts be carried out from an airborne platform “to break the Castro regime’s information blockade on the Cuban people.”

Radio Marti was able to broadcast without interference during its first five years. But Cuban authorities began jamming Radio Marti and TV Marti when the television station began operations in 1990.

“These broadcasts will give the Cuban people uncensored information about their country and the world, and will help bring about a rapid and peaceful transition to democracy,” Ereli said.

  1. Follow up post #1 added on August 23, 2004 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    What do you think the US would do if a Chinese military plane flew just outside our borders broadcasting political propaganda and screwing around with our jamming technology?

    Do you think we would shoot it down?

    Is that what George Bush is actually trying to accomplish? Does he want Fidel to shoot down one of our military planes?

    Great foreign policy there Mr. Bush.

    I’m sure the broadcasts are something like “We’re from the US government and we are here to help you. Trust us…we are two for two liberating people from their evil regimes and we need another win before the November election.”

    A sad state of affairs.



    Cuba consulting services

  2. Follow up post #2 added on August 24, 2004 by Jesus Perez

    The U.S.military may have deposed the Taliban and Saddam’ regimes, but they are far from winning the hearts and minds of the Afghani and Iraqi peoples. As far as Cuba is concern, Mr. Bush is just one more in a long line of U. S. leaders with myopic vision regarding Cuba.


  3. Follow up post #3 added on August 25, 2004 by Gregory Biniowsky

    Being a Canadian who has lived in Cuba for the past nine years, I have gained a bit of insight into Cuban reality. If only some of the policy makers in Washington could gain similar insight. If five years of Radio Marti did not provoke widespread unrest before, what leads the Bush administration to think there will be any difference now. Is it not possible that the Cuban people, notwithstanding their (often justified)criticisms and complaints, might still support Fidel Castro? It is foolish to think that the Cuban people are ignorant about what happens in their country or the rest of the world. Almost all have family or friends who live abroad and are incontact with them. Radio Marti has been entering the country since 1990, but I know few Cubans who are really interested in this self-serving U.S. propaganda. Hey, and if the Bush Administration is soooo interested in democracy and freedom, why don’t they set up a similar campaign for China, Vietnam, or Saudi Arabia for that matter? Or is this airway campaign just plain electoral politics and Miami lobby money greasing some political wheels? Alas the Cubans are no fools and know exactly what the motivations of the U.S. government are.


  4. Follow up post #4 added on August 25, 2004 by Gregory Biniowsky

    Being a Canadian who has lived in Cuba for the past nine years, I have gained a bit of insight into Cuban reality. If only some of the policy makers in Washington could gain similar insight. If five years of Radio Marti did not provoke widespread unrest before, what leads the Bush administration to think there will be any difference now. Is it not possible that the Cuban people, notwithstanding their (often justified)criticisms and complaints, might still support Fidel Castro? It is foolish to think that the Cuban people are ignorant about what happens in their country or the rest of the world. Almost all have family or friends who live abroad and are incontact with them. Radio Marti has been entering the country since 1990, but I know few Cubans who are really interested in this self-serving U.S. propaganda. Hey, and if the Bush Administration is soooo interested in democracy and freedom, why don’t they set up a similar campaign for China, Vietnam, or Saudi Arabia for that matter? Or is this airway campaign just plain electoral politics and Miami lobby money greasing some political wheels? Alas the Cubans are no fools and know exactly what the motivations of the U.S. government are.


  5. Follow up post #5 added on November 06, 2004 by Ai4i

    Pub, you are confused.  The US has never jammed foreign broadcasts directed toward the US market.  It is perfectly legal for any US citizen or resident to listen all they want to any foreign broadcasts.  This is pretty much the case in western republics.


  6. Follow up post #6 added on November 06, 2004 by Gregory

    Ai4i…
    No, I think you are confused. Many western democracies, such as Canada and France, have strict controls over which foreign broadcasts and periodical literature may enter its borders. Moreover, the point I was making was that these broadcasts by the United States are just a waste of your (in the case you are a U.S. citizen) tax money. If you think giving millions of dollars to the fools who run TV Marti and Radio Marti is cool, well then all the power to you. As former head of the U.S. Interests Sections, Wayne Smith, said: Cuba is a domestic policy issue for internal consumption in South Florida (along with the literal consumption of U.S. taxpayer money), not a rational foreign policy issue with a well thought out strategy.


  7. Follow up post #7 added on November 07, 2004 by Ai4i

    Restricting paper publications, most likely.  No jamming from the United States or “mainstream” first world countries.  Why should they care about the broadcasts from economically challenged places, as “our people are hungry and our consumer products suck, but you should endeavor to make your country more like ours”?  The best example I can think of, with regard to restricting information, would be The Las Vegas TV stations having to send cartoons to the Mexican Morales satellite uplink site when they air news locally.  It is not legal for Canadian residents to view American satellite TV, but that is only to protect the Canadian satellite TV industry, not to restrict content.


  8. Follow up post #8 added on November 07, 2004 by Gregory

    Ai4i…
    And do you really think that funding Radio Marti and TV Marti is a good use of your tax money? I don’t know if you have ever been to Cuba, but NOBODY sees TV Marti and the listenership for Radio Marti is limited, to say the least.
    Another thing you are overlooking is the fact that Cuba feels threatened by the United States politically and militarily. It takes these measures, rightly or wrongly, because of this fortress mentality. Would not the United States have attempted to jam transmissions from Imperial Japan or Nazi Germany during the Second World War?


  9. Follow up post #9 added on November 08, 2004 by Ai4i

    No, I agree that the Marti stations are a waste of money intended to placate the strongly anti-Castro Cuban expatriates living in Miami-Dade County, Florida.
    Yes, shortwave broadcasts from axis stations to North America were NEVER jammed.  The fact that shortwave receiver penetration in North America has always been inconsequential may or may not be relevant.  I was an avid shortwave listener during the nineteen seventies and eighties and never heard strange noises on any Warsaw Pact stations.  It is known that Apartheid South Africa was jamming those stations targeting their country.


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