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Posted September 04, 2007 by publisher in Cuba Human Rights

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Cuban News Agency

Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque is in Iran to - along with his Iranian counterpart - preside over the Ministerial Meeting of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries (MNOAL) on Human Rights and Cultural Diversity that takes place in Tehran, the Iranian capital, on Monday and Tuesday.
According to Granma news daily, the meeting follows on the agreements reached during the 14th Summit of MNOAL held in La Habana in September 2006.

The event will be an excellent opportunity for NOAL member countries to reaffirm their commitment to human rights and cultural diversity based on the principles of universality, objectivity, impartiality and non-selectivity.

Likewise, it will contribute to the strengthening of cooperation ties between MNOAL countries.

END

Here’s a photo of Cuba’s Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque sitting next to (on our right) President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran.

http://www.mfa.gov.ir:7777/mfa/cms/system/galleries/pics/Tehranpic/222.jpg

  1. Follow up post #1 added on September 04, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Human rights, cultural diversity, Cuba and Iran.

    Name four things that do not belong in the same sentence.

    This news story is almost like a spoof article. The sad thing is that apparently they are serious about it. If Perez Roque is sitting right next to Ahmadinejad then I guess he is serious.

    I just lost respect for Perez Roque.



    Cuba consulting services

  2. Follow up post #2 added on September 04, 2007 by cubanpete with 127 total posts

    Having these two guys talk about human rights is like having arsonists talk about fire safety.



    For change (cambio) we can believe in.
    http://www.desdecuba.com/generationy

  3. Follow up post #3 added on September 04, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I agree. Probably talks about how to oppress human rights and how to get the UN to add your country to the Human Rights council.



    Cuba consulting services

  4. Follow up post #4 added on September 04, 2007 by Curt

    They are two countries who are bullied by the U.S. Personally I hate the fundamentalist Islam that is practiced in Iran but here we are talking about an imperialist power that refuses to recognize the sovereignty of those countries.


  5. Follow up post #5 added on September 04, 2007 by Cubana with 282 total posts

    I NEVER had any respect for Perez Roque. He used to be Fidel’s personal secretary and is quite simply a thug.


  6. Follow up post #6 added on September 05, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Curt,

    Cuba’s and Iran’s leaders are great role models, right? Boo hoo for the governments of Cuba and Iran.

    The US recognizes the sovereignty of both countries we just choose not to deal with their governments.



    Cuba consulting services

  7. Follow up post #7 added on September 05, 2007 by MiamiCuban

    There’s a saying that goes…“when you point your finger at someone else, there are three pointing right back at you.”  That applies here.  The U.S. is hardly in a position to criticize Iran or Cuba, when U.S. policy has a long history of supporting Latin American dictators who brutalized their people…all in the name of corporate profits.  There is plenty written, if you have the stomach to find out the truth.  The real question is:  what can the U.S. do to encourage human rights around the world, rather than take part in suppressing it?  I guess it’s easier to see someone else’s fault rather than admit one’s own.


  8. Follow up post #8 added on September 05, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    You’re right. We should live in Cuba or Iran.



    Cuba consulting services

  9. Follow up post #9 added on September 05, 2007 by cubanpete with 127 total posts

    In the U.S.A., one can stand on any street corner and freely criticize the American government.  In Cuba and Iran, one can can on any street corner and freely criticize the American government.



    For change (cambio) we can believe in.
    http://www.desdecuba.com/generationy

  10. Follow up post #10 added on September 05, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    So there is freedom of expression in Cuba! grin



    Cuba consulting services

  11. Follow up post #11 added on September 05, 2007 by cubanpete with 127 total posts

    Yes, indeed.  In Cuba, one has total freedom to express agreement with The Party Line.



    For change (cambio) we can believe in.
    http://www.desdecuba.com/generationy

  12. Follow up post #12 added on September 05, 2007 by MiamiCuban

    You obviously haven’t read reports of protestors being arrested for wearing anti-Bush tee shirts.  Yes, it happens even in a “free” country.  Let’s wait and see what else happens as more and more American soldiers lose their lives in an illegal war and people wake up and protest the war en masse.  I think we should worry more about what’s going on here rather than constantly find fault with other countries, especially when they’re victims of U.S. policy.


  13. Follow up post #13 added on September 05, 2007 by Curt

    Publisher, you are really disappointing me by alligning yourself with those right wing fascists in Miami. You used to be objective, what happened?


  14. Follow up post #14 added on September 05, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    What did I say?



    Cuba consulting services

  15. Follow up post #15 added on September 06, 2007 by cubanpete with 127 total posts

    One will be quickly arrested in Cuba for wearing an anti-Fidel or anti-Che t-shirt.  That kind of fashion statement is strictly prohibido in The Workers’ Paradise.  In the West, one is not arrested for merely wearing a Che or anti-Bush t-shirt.  However, if one is committing a criminal act, such as robbing a bank, while so attired, one can indeed expect to be arrested (for the criminal act, not for the attire while so engaged).  As a Canadian, I know that Canada has its shortcomings.  As does America.  However, those shortcomings do not give a free pass to Cuba or any other nation from criticism on its shortcomings.  Of which Cuba has many.



    For change (cambio) we can believe in.
    http://www.desdecuba.com/generationy

  16. Follow up post #16 added on September 06, 2007 by MiamiCuban

    Arresting anyone for wearing a t-shirt that expresses one’s beliefs or attitudes is wrong, no matter what country it happens in.  My point is that it happens in the U.S., too, so where’s the logic and the benefit in pointing the finger at others?  I’d like to see someone with a Che t-shirt walk the streets of Miami.  In all likelihood he’ll end up getting assaulted…and in all probability the police will not come to his defense. 
    Also, the people I"ve mentioned who were arrested for wearing anti-Bush t-shirts were not in the process of committing a crime.  They were attending a Bush rally.  As far as I know, political rallies are not closed off to opponents.  Also, people have even been harassed by the police for their anti-Bush bumper stickers.  These are not good signs and I think there ought to be more concern about this rather than finding fault with other countries.


  17. Follow up post #17 added on September 06, 2007 by cubanpete with 127 total posts

    Concern about problems in one’s own country should not preclude one from expressing concern about problems in other countries.  It’s that simple.  Nuff said.



    For change (cambio) we can believe in.
    http://www.desdecuba.com/generationy

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