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Posted April 11, 2008 by publisher in OFAC

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In the most recent OFAC Civil Penalties report, four out of the eight violations are Cuba related and three of those are for buying Cuban cigars over the internet.

The other Cuba sanctions violation is:

United Advantage Northwest Federal Credit Union, successor to Advantage Northwest Federal Credit Union, Settles Cuban Asset Control Regulations Allegations: United Advantage Federal Credit Union, successor to Advantage Northwest Federal Credit Union, Portland, OR (“Advantage”), has remitted $2,970 to settle allegations of violations of the Cuban Assets Control Regulations in July 2003. OFAC alleged that Advantage acted without an OFAC license by processing a funds transfer destined for Cuba. Advantage did not voluntarily disclose this matter to OFAC.

Below is the OFAC language for the three Cuban cigar violations:

One individual has agreed to a settlement totaling $1,087 for allegedly dealing in property in which Cuba or a Cuban national had an interest: Between March 2004 and July 2004, on multiple occasions, the individual allegedly purchased Cuban-origin cigars offered for sale on the Internet. The individual did not voluntarily disclose this matter to OFAC.

One individual was assessed a penalty totaling $411.04 for allegedly dealing in property in which Cuba or a Cuban national had an interest: In 2003 and 2004, the individual allegedly purchased Cuban cigars over the Internet. The individual did not voluntarily disclose this matter to OFAC.

One individual has agreed to a settlement totaling $400 for allegedly dealing in property in which Cuba or a Cuban national had an interest: On July 12, 2004, September 12, 2004, December 23, 2004, July 3, 2005, and August 3, 2005, the individual allegedly purchased Cuban-origin cigars offered for sale on the Internet. The individual did not voluntarily disclose this matter to OFAC.

Meanwhile three of the eight violations in this month’s report were for Iranian trade sanctions and one was for narcotics trafficking.

  1. Follow up post #1 added on April 11, 2008 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    So, the fines for the Cuban cigar purchasing violations were $1898.04 TOTAL. Add the other one in and you find that OFAC collected $4868.04 in fines for Cuban Embargo violations.

    Those government hacks are really earning their pay.

    How many tax dollars and much time went into chasing these Cuban Embargo violations? A LOT more than a couple thousand dollars.

    This is time and money taken directly away from chasing terrorist money. Obviously OFAC should be allocating these resources towards that end rather than chasing Cuban cigar buyers.

    Wake up people. OFAC is wasting your money and quite possibly jeopardizing your life with these silly distractions.

    So, if you are into drug trafficking or Iranian trade violations, don’t worry. It seems as though OFAC is focusing more on finding individuals who buy cigars over the Internet.



    Cuba consulting services

  2. Follow up post #2 added on April 11, 2008 by pacster with 5 total posts

    It’s all a game. Read the article from the Nation regarding what Cubans want. http://www.thenation.com/docprint.mhtml?i=20080414&s=timerman
    I’ve been hassled more than once by US customs agents upon returning from Cuba with or without a permit. It is especially severe if you have the misfortune to come through Miami, much nicer in the Bahamas.
    None of my friends are excited about the US coming back. They all fear loss of control to capitalism as big corporations as much as to their present government. Unfortunately in spite of a colossal failed experiment in Iraq, the US and many of its citizens persist in the hubristic belief that we know what’s best for the rest of the world. I believe the next evolutionary step will be the development of the glass navel so that our pols can see what’s out there.


  3. Follow up post #3 added on June 03, 2009 by John J. Young

    A few years ago, our local sailing club, in Key West, was fined $11,000 by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, of the US Treasury Department, for a sporting race they sponsored running Key West to Havana. They carried humanitarian aid and were in possession of an OFAC license permitting such an endeavor. However, a new government ruling indicated a second license had been required, allowing a vessel, owned and maintained by a US citizen, entry to a Cuban port.

    The $11,000 fine has not been paid (primarily because the officers of the sailing club do not have that kind of money). But the sailors want to challenge the regulation (vessel entry in Cuba) and continue the neighborly regatta. Afterall, Cuba’s merely 85 miles from Key West, right?

    Point of all this . . . what can the Key Westers do to have the fine rescinded and a new licensing procedure set up to continue the race, now that there appears to be a (m-m-m) “softening” of relations between the two countries?


  4. Follow up post #4 added on June 03, 2009 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    John,

    Thanks for the update on the status of your OFAC situation.

    Read this article about the Sarasota Yacht Club regarding their involvement in the Cuba regatta and maybe they will have some information for you.



    Cuba consulting services

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