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Posted April 16, 2007 by publisher in Castro's Cuba

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Email from Cuba Transition Project

Cubans can not:

• Travel abroad without government permission.

• Change jobs without government permission.

• Change residence without government permission.

• Access the Internet without government permission (the Internet is closely monitored and controlled by the government. Only 1.67% of the population has access to the Internet).

• Send their children to a private or religious school (all schools are government run, there are no religious schools in Cuba).

• Watch independent or private radio or TV stations (all TV and radio stations are owned and run by the government). Cubans illegally watch/listen to foreign broadcasts.

• Read books, magazines or newspapers, unless approved/published by the government (all books, magazines and newspapers are published by the government).

• Receive publications from abroad or from visitors (punishable by jail terms under Law 88).

• Visit or stay in tourist hotels, restaurants, and resorts (these are off-limits to Cubans).

• Seek employment with foreign companies on the island, unless approved by the government.

• Run for public office unless approved by Cuba’s Communist Party.

• Own businesses, unless they are very small and approved by the government and pay onerous taxes.

• Join an independent labor union (there is only one, government controlled labor union and no individual or collective bargaining is allowed; neither are strikes or protests).

• Retain a lawyer, unless approved by the government.

• Choose a physician or hospital. Both are assigned by the government.

• Refuse to participate in mass rallies and demonstrations organized by the Cuban Communist Party.

• Criticize the Castro regime or the Cuban Communist Party, the only party allowed in Cuba.

The CTP can be contacted 305-284-CUBA (2822) or http://ctp.iccas.miami.edu

  1. Follow up post #1 added on April 17, 2007 by Cuban American

    I am just waiting for someone to come in here and argue that they have free health care and education, I will pay 10 times what I pay now for education and health care to have the liberties I enjoy in this country.  Freedom is priceless.


  2. Follow up post #2 added on April 17, 2007 by Cubana with 282 total posts

    Just a minor point of accuracy - Cubans can visit or stay in tourist hotels, restaurants and resorts IF they are married to a foreigner.


  3. Follow up post #3 added on April 17, 2007 by John R. Bomar

    Yes, the liberal defenders of El Jefe and his regime never mention this aspect of Cuban life.  To this list I would add:  cannot pass the street without being under watchful eye of a state police security man in civilian clothes. 

    In Trinidad we had five of these “dead-in-the-face-men” get up and awkardly leave after “monitoring” the message of the bishop at the Good Friday Mass.
    Of course, everyone knew who they were.  The message was clear:  “you ARE being watched.” 

    The defenders of Cuban communism, which they now call “socialism” because of the fall from grace of the former term, turn a blind eye to this reality; just as the defenders of Herr Bush’s extreme measures to limit civil liberties such as free travel turn a blind eye to this abuse of power.  Both kettles are as black as a star and moonless night. 

    John R. Bomar


  4. Follow up post #4 added on April 17, 2007 by Pete Chavez

    No John Bomar No, you are very wrong!
    Have you been so coddled by this society that you have not any perspective?
    I’ve lived in both “kettles” (which I doubt very much that you have) and the Cuban one is as you say “as black a star and moonless night.”  This one here is as bright and shining as the sun itself.  The shine has just been dulled somewhat from the last two presidential terms.  Last time I checked this morning, none of the “List of Can Not Dos in Cuba” exist here.


  5. Follow up post #5 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Cubans can not:


    • Travel abroad without government permission.


    Cubans have to get a passport, just as any other country, and this does not mean that Cubans cannot travel to other countries, as many do all the time for business, but also to assure the USA embargo is kept against Cubans traveling to the USA.

    • Change jobs without government permission.


    For the most part that is lie.  However, in the USA you cannot go take any job you want to within any corporation, business or USA government.  To change positions you need permission within these structures. Granted the Cuban government is the largest employer, but all the USA governments combined in the USA make the largest employer in the USA. There are hundreds of trade unions in Cuba that seek the benefits of employees, that are not government sponsored, and legal, membership is voluntary, that control employment, just as in the USA, wages, and ensure proper placement of the labor force. In addition, there is a growing private business force in Cuba.


    Therefore, the above statement is extremely slanted.

    • Change residence without government permission.


    Private real estate is allowed in Cuba, and growing, and it is the Cuban government that “guarantees” title, so of course the government is involved in the transfer of real estate. No title then you cannot take possession. In the USA title transfer is handled by titles companies, but even still—- no title no possession. If a person is renting from the Cuban Subsidized rents, then of course you need the Cuban government permission to change residents, just as government “Section 8” in the USA.


    So what is the point? Just more propaganda about Cuba is all. 

     

    • Access the Internet without government permission (the Internet is closely monitored and controlled by the government. Only 1.67% of the population has access to the Internet).


    Cuba is building their infrastructure and no doubt, the USA embargo is a major obstacle to overcome. Cuba is putting in a massive fiber optic line to Venezuela, to improve their communications and information and internet access, as Cuba is cut off from the USA.  However let us compare to other so-called “democratic” countries as Haiti, there is virtually no internet access.


    If you want to call “pass words” government regulations—- that is silly,  that is so common every where it is not worth mentioning. China, Vietnam, Russia, is involved in building the Cuban internet access, and business is good with a large market. I doubt that figure of 1.67% is accurate, and is out dated. 


    • Send their children to a private or religious school (all schools are government run, there are no religious schools in Cuba).


    Public schools and community colleges are massive in the USA, so what. The end results are Cuba is on par and even exceeds in many points the education level in the USA and Western Europe. Nothing I ever read about in Cuba says you cannot teach your children at home about religions. Schooling,  K though PhD in Cuba is free, and the education level is recognized worldwide, and to international standards. It is not governments place to be involved with religions so what is the big deal? NONE. There are many churches in Cuba, go to any one you want to, but keep religions out of education.


    • Watch independent or private radio or TV stations (all TV and radio stations are owned and run by the government). Cubans illegally watch/listen to foreign broadcasts.


    I do not believe that, there is nothing in the Cuban constitution that makes such a claim and I have never read any codes nor Cuban government regulations that support such a claim. CNN is played freely, 24-7 in public in many places in Cuba including their airport. Therefore, there is no basis for such a claim as watching/listening to foreign broadcast is illegal.


    Private press does not mean there is good reporting. In addition, on the other side you do not have all those stupid idiot commercials. In addition, my I remind you that in England (UK) there is special government tax to support the BBC, that is the official broadcast of the UK. For the most part the BBC is reasonable reporting. So again, you have to show exclusivity to your propaganda against Cuba.


    • Read books, magazines or newspapers, unless approved/published by the government (all books, magazines and newspapers are published by the government).


    Book fairs are common in Cuba and extremely popular; one article I read one such fair sold 8 million books in a few days. These fairs are supported by foreign writers and publishers from all over the world. Reading is national pass time in Cuba that has about a 99% literacy rate. The national language is “Spanish” so most all books have to be translated and then published. Porno is NOT aloud in Cuba, and so much other trash, and just because there is a book does not make it worth reading.


    Our USA government funded schools freely use censorship all the time, USA government(s) information is highly censored. Highly slanted reporting in order to gain access to USA government information and officials is common by our USA press as AP and other newspapers.


    Here in Oregon, can I buy a Russian newspaper? I have no idea where to look for one, as it is not available. So what.


    To say:


    (all books, magazines and newspapers are published by the government)


    I believe is a big fat lie, as Cuban unions have publications, churches have publications and I am assuming many more publications from foreign companies that have large investments in Cuba. You are saying Cuba has “outlawed” writing? I do not believe it.


    • Receive publications from abroad or from visitors (punishable by jail terms under Law 88).


    YES, if you take money from a foreign company, person, or government and print propaganda with the intent to over throw the Cuban government using that money, that is illegal—even so in the USA and in every other country.


    • Visit or stay in tourist hotels, restaurants, and resorts (these are off-limits to Cubans).


    I doubt that, however there are many foreign motels in Cuba that filled up in advance as tourism is out pacing availability of space. Cuba is building more hotels as it can, this is a booming business in Cuba. Cuba is highly dependant on foreign trade (currency) and rightly so.  Priority is given as needed, as the Cuban government pays with USA cash for millions of foodstuffs from USA farmers. Many hotel have restaurants that you have to stay at the hotel (resorts) in order to go to the restaurant. Many call this call this ”free enterprise”. So what is the problem?


    Also noted that in the USA there are lands and resorts that are limited to a very few. I need a permit—that is a year out or more—to go to the Mt. Jefferson Meadows, and USA road closures into wild lands is reaching an all time high, because these lands are very sensitive and can be damaged by human influence. 


    • Seek employment with foreign companies on the island, unless approved by the government.


    These hotels employ many thousands of Cubans, and the Cuban government, and trade unions guarantee the highest wages possible. The Cuban government runs a massive employment agency and guarantees a job to any one that wants to work. So yeas if there is an opening the Cuban government will send out the best candidates for a company to choose from. Therefore, what—we have in the USA massive state employment agencies also, and that is not considered a “bad thing” but the contrary these government agencies are very much needed in society.

     

    • Run for public office unless approved by Cuba’s Communist Party.


    This is flat right out lie. I suggest you read the Cuban constitution. To date in the Cuban People’s Assembly a very large percentage of the “elected” officials do NOT belong to the communist party. In fact, by the Cuban constitution, NO political party, including the communist party, is allowed to advertise its members for elected office—-We should have these statutes here in the USA.


    • Own businesses, unless they are very small and approved by the government and pay onerous taxes.


    Small businesses in Cuba are growing in number, and growth is enviable and subject to rules and regulations just as in the USA. As a former business owner in the USA,  before I retired, I am here to tell you the USA taxes, rules, regulations, and codes are massive, not only from the Federal government but also from the State government. In the USA there are government land zonings, trade laws, accounting, traffic flow requirements, building codes, insurances, product liability, SAIF and their government regulations, OSA and that long list regulations, and I have not even started on the limitations here in the USA to owning your own business. 


    • Join an independent labor union (there is only one, government controlled labor union and no individual or collective bargaining is allowed; neither are strikes or protests).


    That is a flat out lie. There are hundreds of independent trade unions in Cuba. There is massive collective bargaining, the unions make suggestions and present to the Cuban government it needs and requirements, and changes are made and common.  Membership to any union is voluntary, strikes are allowed, but not when national security is involved, just as in the USA. In the USA, there are many laws that prohibit essential services to be withheld by a strike. In addition, there are times when the USA governments have ordered people back to work accordingly. 


    • Retain a lawyer, unless approved by the government.


    And in the USA we have the BAR, state and national,  that in order to be a lawyer you must comply to their education standards, and be licensed by this organization—or you do not practice law. This covers all aspects of practicing law in the USA. This is a massive organization, and self-regulating, just like any other government. The BAR must give its approval to any judge or attorney in the USA. If you do not like your attorney then go get another one, as they all more or less come out of the same mold, just as in the USA.


    • Choose a physician or hospital. Both are assigned by the government.


    Another LIE—NO one is forced to one particular doctor in Cuba—they have an over abundance of doctors, in fact, many say Cuba has too many doctors. The medical standards in Cuba are recognized worldwide, and by WHO, of very high quality and no doubt in some rare medical needs there are few specialists to choose from, just as the USA. Seeing all medical cost is free from before birth to grave, is better than the USA in this regard, I find little to no complaint.


    However, have you read in the news about the USA VA hospital? Rats and mold on the walls, filth in the hallways and lack of basic care—-not a very good sight.  There is also massive US government funding to clean it up.


    • Refuse to participate in mass rallies and demonstrations organized by the Cuban Communist Party.


    Again, parcel truth will get you nowhere. There is NO authority for the Cuban communist party to demand NON-members to do anything, and if a person is member, that is voluntary, there is responsibility. So what? There are many people here in the USA that do not like any political party as running for office as an independent is common and growing. We have political parties in the USA that form demonstrations all the time—no big deal.


    Cuba is a constitutional state, not a political party state—-read their constitution.


    • Criticize the Castro regime or the Cuban Communist Party, the only party allowed in Cuba.

    You most certainly can criticize the Cuban government and its elected leaders as Castro is elected. However, more importantly, you cannot seek underhanded means to over throw the government nor its leaders, just as in the USA and any other country. You can seek to change policy, regulations, codes, and such the like being orderly, but NOT violent overthrow, nor to engage in open rebellion to disrupt society, and to discontinue government and private services. Just as in any other country. As from many reports that I have read, politics is commonly talked in open, by most everyone in Cuba. With a 95% voter turn out rate I would think so.

    This article by CPT is nothing but trash, and I would highly suspect is being funded by the US CIA, or some militant Cuban exiles. Moreover, if they are caught by Cuban officials, in Cuban jurisdiction, they will do hard jail time for taking money from a foreign government(s) or foreign organizations with the intent to disrupt Cuban society. Then the CPT can claim to be a prisoner of consciences, just as the others, in their non-sense bought and paid for propaganda.

    Cuba certainly has faults, just as any other country, but they are working and growing for good things. Cuba is a small island with 11.2 million people, and there must be order to their society not only to survive but to also prosper. There are many that would like to see the downfall of the Cuban nation for personal gain, regardless of the human misery that they would cause—-I am not one of them.


    Don


  6. Follow up post #6 added on April 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Don,

    I appreciate your lengthy comments and believe that the truth is somewhere in between the CTP and your comments.

    You make many valid points. You also make several points with such passion but so wrong. Not just in opinion but in fact.

    Case in point…Cubans do work in hotels. Hotels are joint ventures. The hotel pays the Cuban government prevailing international wages but then the Cuban government pays the workers in pesos. Did you know that?

    No one is elected who is not in the Communist party.

    Cubans are not allowed to have private television satellite dishes.

    Cubans cannot stay in tourist hotels and in most cases cannot even enter tourist hotels even if accompanied by a tourist.

    Do a little more homework if you are going to challenge the CTP.

    The truth lies between your thoughts and the CTP facts.



    Cuba consulting services

  7. Follow up post #7 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Case in point…Cubans do work in hotels. Hotels are joint ventures. The hotel pays the Cuban government prevailing international wages but then the Cuban government pays the workers in pesos. Did you know that?


    Don

    Yes I did know that and from my stand point as an employer in the USA that is very good deal.

    USA companies spend billions on doing parole taxes and accounting. This cost is not gendered in Cuba. The Cuban Government takes its “cut” and gives the rest to the employees, just as the USA does in pay role taxes, have you looked at your pay stub lately? Therefore, what is the difference?


    From an economic standard, Cubans barter over wages threw their unions to the government, and the Cuban Government guarantees wages NO matter if the company folds. The Cuban government then passes this cost on.


    I do not see any problem here, just another way to organize cash flow and guarantee the employees are paid.


    As I have read it was the independent Cuban unions that voted for such an arrangement, (Cuban government collects and then distributes the pay role) and they got it.  As to Cuban history, the Cuban labor force has been screws over by foreign corporations and they do not want that to happen again.


    The Cuban system of pay role on its face sounds horrible because it is contrary to USA culture—but that does NOT make the Cuban system bad, just different is all; with benefits and detriments as any human made system.

    Show me the accounting used in the Cuban system, are employees aware of the deductions, it is a flat percentage or itemized and is the same standard used to all, and are there justifications for deviations of deductions, depending on circumstance. 


    This is what is important, NOT propaganda.


    I hardly doubt the Cuban government misses payroll to its employees. You are also telling me the Cuban government does NOT want the Cubans to purchase goods and to be successful—-I do not believe it, and neither do you.


    Cuba is coming out of a great depression, and they are doing good and getting better. In addition, they are being successful even against the massive USA embargo. The USA also had great depression, remember, caused by runaway capitalism—but you can not keep a good people down and neither can the Cubans be kept down.


    I like Cuba and they have been bad mouthed to no end, and USA propaganda against that country does not hold up to the slightest scrutiny.


    It is highly argued that business, in a free enterprise, should NOT be government tax collectors, at the expense of business. The USA government never pays business a dime to do the government’s tax collecting. Many feel this is wrong.


    Don


  8. Follow up post #8 added on April 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Don,

    I guess you should go to Cuba and open a business. How is it good that the hotels pay the Cuban government say $15 per hour for an employee and then the Cuban government pays that employee about $0.15 per hour?

    That’s one hell of a “payroll tax” as you call it.

    Listen, I know all about US propaganda and Cuban propaganda. You, my friend, are caught up in Cuban propaganda.

    I admire your ability and desire to try to see Cuba from an inside Cuba perspective but if you think communism is better than democracy, there is a paradise in Cuba just waiting to give you free housing, free healthcare and a free college education.

    Oh yeah, check your freedom at the Jose Marti airport because you won’t be using it.



    Cuba consulting services

  9. Follow up post #9 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    No one is elected who is not in the Communist party.

    Wong:

    You are making an unsuported claim.

    Here it is: Cubas current Constitution was approved in a referendum in 1976 with 95% backing.

    Special note given here

    http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:BNgyB5sdOQcJ:www.cuba-solidarity.org/faqdocs/Cuban-political-system-facts.pdf+Cuba+constitution+voting&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us&lr=lang_en

    (yes this is long address but it is valid)


    Political parties are not involved in the selection of candidates in the elections or in
    campaigns for the Assembly. Candidates do not have to be members of the Communist
    Party to run. Almost half Cubas national parliament are not members of the Communist
    Party

    Candidates run as individuals on the basis of their records and not in highly expensive,
    party-ran campaigns, meaning that ordinary people have a chance of getting elected.

    Community and civil society organisations such as trade unions play a major role in the
    nomination and selection of candidates through local meetings of a commission set up
    for the purpose.

    So, count more USA propgada that just bit the dust.


    How does Cuba’s Political System Work?

    1.  Basic issues/facts

    Cubas current Constitution was approved in a referendum in 1976 with 95% backing.

    Presidential terms are of 5 years – there is no limit on how many terms a president can
    serve. Fidel has been President since 1976.

    Article 94 of the Cuban Constitution states: “In cases of the absence, illness or death of
    the president of the Council of State, the first vice president assumes the president’s
    duties.”

    Cuba’s national legislature, the National Assembly of People’s Power (Asamblea
    Nacional de Poder Popular), has 609 members who serve five-year terms. Candidates
    for the Assembly are elected by public referendum. All Cuban citizens over sixteen
    years of age who have not been found guilty of a criminal offense can vote.

    Article 131 of the Constitution states that voting shall be “through free, equal and secret
    vote”. Article 136 states: “In order for deputies or delegates to be considered elected
    they must get more than half the number of valid votes cast in the electoral districts.”
    Votes are counted in public view. By law, there must be at least 2 candidates, and there
    can be up to 8. Turnouts are regularly over 95%.

    The National Assembly elects the Council of Ministers (the Cabinet) and Council of
    State, which form the executive branch of government. Fidel is elected as President of
    both these bodies. To be President of Cuba and the Council of State therefore, you
    have to be an elected member of the National Asssembly and therefore have to have
    been elected by over 50% of the electorate in their own constituency (as Fidel is
    currently). In turn, Fidel has to be elected as President by a vote of the parliament.

    Political parties are not involved in the selection of candidates in the elections or in
    campaigns for the Assembly. Candidates do not have to be members of the Communist
    Party to run. Almost half Cubas national parliament are not members of the Communist
    Party

    Candidates run as individuals on the basis of their records and not in highly expensive,
    party-ran campaigns, meaning that ordinary people have a chance of getting elected.

    Community and civil society organisations such as trade unions play a major role in the
    nomination and selection of candidates through local meetings of a commission set up
    for the purpose.


  10. Follow up post #10 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Yes, I have thought about going to Cuba to open a business—but thanks to my USA government, I cannot.

    You said:


    I guess you should go to Cuba and open a business. How is it good that the hotels pay the Cuban government say $15 per hour for an employee and then the Cuban government pays that employee about $0.15 per hour?

    I doubt your figures, but even still, there is an economic exchange difference as the UK Pound is worth about two Dollars American. Taxes commonly run 40 to 50% in many Socialist countries that are highly respectable as Germany, Sweden, and the UK to say the least. Cuba is a represenative republic form of government.


    The Cuban government would love to have me, and others, open shop in their country. I think it would be exciting. However, in that country I have to abide by their rules, and so far I have not seen anything out of line, just different is all.


    Cuba has excellent criminal law enforcements, up to high standards as in any modern well-organized country. Because of the climate, location, high education, and many other benefits, not to mention wonderful people,  Cuba would be a great place to open shop.


    The fault is neither in the Cuban government, nor in economics, nor in having excellent business opportunities, but the fault is clearly with the USA. Trade is always good for every one with international standards. Therefore, who is held as a prisoner in their own country—in regards to the USA trade embargo against Cuba—-it is Americans.


    Don


  11. Follow up post #11 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Listen, I know all about US propaganda and Cuban propaganda. You, my friend, are caught up in Cuban propaganda.

    ^^^

    Don

    Leave off the personal attacks and we can have a conversation.

    ^^^
    I admire your ability and desire to try to see Cuba from an inside Cuba perspective but if you think communism is better than democracy,


    ^^^^
    Don

    The form of comunisum ( I assume as was/is in Russia and China) that you are speaking of is not the kind found in Cuba. Comunisume takes many forms just as demrociy does, and is also synominus with socialisum,  Cuba has developed their own systems, highly based on trial and error, and subject to change, has chanded and will continue to change just is in the USA. I can point to hundrerds if not thousands of socialist activities of the USA government, we don’t find that bad.


    The social ills produced in demoricy, as the nasty McCarthy ira, is one of many examples. There is not any perfect government, but rather nothing but a series of corrections.  Also you should be aware the USA is a representative republic form of government, and that demoricy is narrowly defined has having elections of “representatives”. Same as Cuba.

    ^^^^
    there is a paradise in Cuba just waiting to give you free housing, free healthcare and a free college education.

    ^^^

    Don

    That is a good start to a paradise, and there is nothing wrong at all with having a perfect model to raise standards. Here in the USA we give free or all but free housing to all kinds of people, from the young to the aged and many in between, we count this as a good thing to do, so we do it.


    Cuba counts free health care, the right to work,  and education a human “right”, a common necessity,  it is the responsibility of governments to supply these goods. Many countries agree, and the USA is fast moving in this direction, and sort of lagging behind the civilized world.


    Don


  12. Follow up post #12 added on April 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Don,

    Fidel does not want your business. He wants your tourist dollars.

    As the Publisher of the Havana Journal for four years and following Cuba for many more, I know a thing or two about Cuban politics, Cuban culture, Fidel Castro, the Embargo, US politics and US-Cuba policy.

    You can believe me or not but you are not right on so many levels that I don’t have the time to comment on each one.

    Until you really know Fidel and really know Cuban culture, you shouldn’t be so pro-Cuba and so anti-US.

    Sticking up for Cuba is an admirable thing to do and you have a few minor valid points but if you know what I know you would understand the real Cuba.

    That’s about all I can say.

    PS I am not Cuban and do not have any Cuban relatives so I don’t have any “baggage”.

    Good luck in your research for the truth.



    Cuba consulting services

  13. Follow up post #13 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Thank you for the good luck, and I return the same.


    I am not anti American, there is much good in this country, and much improvement needed. People do not stop being people because of an ambiguous label of government with subjective interpretations. As democracy has been described as a “controlled and peaceful rebellion that is constant”. In addition, Cub’s revolution is on going also, the similarities of Cuba and the USA are too great to ignore.


    I read many articles on this board and I don’t comment, but this on this article I could not restrain myself.


    I have read many speeches by Castro, he is entertaining and makes good points, I see why he has been successful, and for what reason he supports, his cause and I certainly don’t see him hurting any one. Of course there is propaganda, the USA government and so called free press is a master at it, and one needs to be on guard at all times, “in any country”, so I study law full time, as it cuts threw the BS real fast.


    I could also go on as to the USA massive funding of propaganda against Cuba, slanted press reports, Cuban exiles seeking heated revenge and all their web sites, and it is also a fact the world at large does NOT share the USA’s resentment nor political goals of domination that the USA cultivates against a peaceful country called Cuba.


    I freely admitted that Cuba has faults, but not that bad by any means, where every lie told about Cuba is a good lie. You do know Cubans like their country also, but this is a bad thing to report in USA news. It does not fallow political protocol.


    I have read, studied, and I have a copy of the Helms Burton Act. The act is a disgrace of political mongering against Cuba, with NO regard to the Cuban people. It is in violation of international law, falls a little short of declaring physical war, and did declare an economic war against Cuba because Cuba defended its air space against USA private airplanes that were littering up the Havana streets with propaganda papers and bumper stickers that Cuban civil sanitation workers had to clean up. 

    Cuban official asked the USA repeatedly to stop it, and in light of the USA’s refusal, two planes were shot down by the Cuban air force. In retaliation, the Helms Burton act was passed by the USA congress and singed into law by Clinton in the hopes to save his failing presidency.


    In addition, this is not even a start of the discord the USA has against Cuba, but goes back for hundreds of years. In addition, eventually this crap is going to come to an end and the sooner the better.


    So I had to raise my voice in discontent, on this one article, and I thank you for the space to write, and writing without passion is not much writing, and not worth reading, most of the time.


    As you said there is much to say, many points to make on both sides, and the truth does NOT lay in the middle somewhere but only in the facts and in the evidence.


    You have a great day, and I wish you well.

     

    Don


  14. Follow up post #14 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Fidel does not want your business. He wants your tourist dollars.

     

    The same thing can be said for any USA president, every current state governor, and the same thing for any given congressional representative, and for a fact any USA corporation, even to your neighbor next door.


    Fact is, I can live with that, what you said about Castro, even though it is a lie. It very well could be an honest statement about a man and honesty is hard to come by. Cuba as with any other country, for thousands of years with humans, if you want my tourist dollars you will have to tolerate my influence, and I do not go silently into to the night. Trade changes a country. 


    Castro is paid 900 pesos a month, worthless in USA economy, and I have no reason to think other than that is the net sum of Castro’s wealth. And I really don’t care about him, or any other president. I care about the rule of LAW. I do not care if a president hates me, likes me, or just wants my money. I do care that political leaders are “LAW ABIDING”, conforms to the constitution that the people voted on, and I care about the courts and police powers that give teeth to laws.


    Cuba is a law abiding country, there is order so humans can live, progress, and seek what they desire in life, and there are restraints even in the USA that humans have to contend with, some more than others.


    Therefore, it really does not do you any good to try to hit emotional hot buttons of who cares about whom or who wants what. As an American, I am callused over to be concerned of who wants the money, and cast out the person, as it is “every one” in a capitalist, democratic, or communist society. That is why I go by laws—with teeth.


    This also why I like the USA—law rules. In this regard, the USA is the most contained, restrained, and submissive people on earth. So much for freedoms. Freedoms, with it many exceptions, exist only as the rule of law with teeth. Castro is just a small player as with any other president.


    Don


  15. Follow up post #15 added on April 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Wow. You really have no idea about Cuba.

    You think there are laws in Cuba? It’s Fidel’s law. Simple as that.

    People are arrested and convicted without attorneys and sent to prison for 25 years for protesting against the Cuban government.

    I think you are just trying to be provocative because no reasonable person, especially one who studies law can be as closed minded and wrong as you.

    That is not a personal attack. I like good debate but you are stating facts with passion and you are wrong on so many levels that I can now see you are just posting ridiculous statements just to see how long it would take for me to ban you.

    Yes, ban you. Ban you for fooling around and not being serious, not for your opinions.



    Cuba consulting services

  16. Follow up post #16 added on April 19, 2007 by Don

    Hang on their, post the Cuban constitution and let us look at it.


    Post Cuban criminal law and let us look at it.


    Post Cuban civil laws and let us look at it.


    Post USA land use laws by state and county and let us look at it.


    Post the Helms Burton act, and let us look at it.


    In addition, the list goes on


    There is no need to ban me—- you are the boss, just ask me not to post here and I will comply. I am not a flippant poster, not out to do you nor your board harm. You left space to post so I did. I have a very strong argument to the contrary of your ideas about Cuba, and I can back it up. Show me I am wrong and I will admit it, I will back down, but being on an open board, I will not back down on a repeat of propaganda with NO substance, no quotes of law, no validation of facts, and no valid reasoning.


    I have not attacked you, I showed only contrary ideas. I ask you to be specific, if you want me to verify my sources then say so. I will use primary sources of law that are available to me, and secondary as needed, and then sources as I can find that I think are reliable. I will post the links for your judgments, so no details are left out.


    It takes work and study to write good essays of value that are informative and as factual as possible. I find the essay above, the start of this thread, gross and lacking in all accounts of validation, just reckless puking out of unverified opinions to slam a people, degrade a country, and vilify a government of law and order.


    So the choice is yours—you want to continue or not—If not say so and I am gone by my own respect to you and to your board.


    From the list of “what you can’t do in Cuba” pick a topic, and I will run with it. My intent is to teach, and if my teaching is wrong I will admit it.


    Don


  17. Follow up post #17 added on April 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    This is ridiculous. I can tell that you have never been to Cuba yet you act like an authority.

    I am not going to argue on your level.

    I’m trying to teach you about Cuba yet you want to teach me about Cuba but you don’t know much about the subject other than what you read in Castro’s speeches.

    I am closing this thread. You are welcome to post comments on other topics so long as they are relevant.

    Read the top story on the main page that I just posted about Mr. Madan and how he was arrested and sentenced to four years in prison for “social dangerousness”  without a defense attorney.

    Feel free to comment on the “laws” of Cuba in that post.



    Cuba consulting services

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