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Posted February 06, 2010 by publisher in Cuba Human Rights

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AP

Cuban police harassed and briefly jailed some 35 political dissidents this week in the eastern city of Camaguey, a Cuban human rights group said Friday.

Twenty-three dissidents were “brutally beaten and detained” after marching Wednesday in a demonstration in Camaguey, 530 kilometers (330 miles) east of the capital Havana, the underground Committee for Human Rights and National Reconciliation (CCDHRN) said in a statement.

The demonstrators were protesting “the cruel and inhuman treatment” of Orlando Zapata, a jailed political dissident on a hunger strike since December, according to CCDHRN president Elizardo Sanchez.

The protesters were briefly jailed, then released.

Another 12 dissidents, as well as two detained Wednesday, were arrested Thursday at a Camaguey home where they were planning “acts of solidarity” in support of Zapata, whom Amnesty International has declared a prisoner of conscience.

The protesters were briefly jailed, and all but five have been released, the statement read.

The CCDHRN said it was concerned over Zapata’s health, and called for his unconditional release.

In its January annual report, the group said that there are 201 political prisoners in Cuba.

Authorities on the communist island insist there are no political prisoners, but rather US-financed “mercenaries” jailed for threatening Cuban national security.

  1. Follow up post #1 added on February 07, 2010 by HavanAndrew with 87 total posts

    Protests of different types have been ramping up, all are small by nature and isolated from the greater situation. The word on the street in Havana is that at some point all of these small demonstrations will connect with one and another. The Cuban authorities have been acting quickly with the knowledge that it will be very difficult to contain when all of these individual efforts become one. The current number of people being detained is far greater than human rights groups estimate.


  2. Follow up post #2 added on February 07, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Let’s just hope that everyone stays safe and that the Cuban government accepts their fate. They’ve been lucky for 50 years so they know it’s going to come to an end some day.



    Cuba consulting services

  3. Follow up post #3 added on February 07, 2010 by HavanAndrew with 87 total posts

    Yo! Publisher;
    Imagine a country not hooked up to FaceBook. The youth of Cuba through partial streams of internet are quite aware, multi lingual, with dreams to see other countries. The age group of 15-25 are the greatest threat to Castro Inc. Quite simply put, they are fed up. Who can blame them. Castro Inc. will be defeated without blood, instead with electronic information. Cuba now has something different, the people network, electronic storage devices, discs, cards and usb thumb drives physically transferred from computer to computer. You see, the Cuban authorites can control the wires but the people have a way around it. They are merely saying that if Cuba is such a brilliant place to live in, then the authorities should not fear citizens of Cuba freely interacting with other countries and its citizens. Denying all Cubans free access to the world’s network, the internet, is a form of cruel punishment on its own citizens. The youth of Cuba with their brilliant minds are ready to take on the world. Take a look at this post, innocent art students want to take on the world. 

    http://havanajournal.com/forums/viewthread/1427/

    P.S.
    Fidel and Raul, please do the right thing. The people want to free their minds of the restrictions you apply. The youth of Cuba will win the electronic information war and then you are done. No way out. The youth of Cuba have acted in a polite and civil manner, something you must respect. At no point have they advocated violence for change. You must respect the fact, it is now their time to guide the country.


  4. Follow up post #4 added on February 09, 2010 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Cuba has released the last five of a group of 35 dissidents it arrested last week for demonstrating on behalf of a conscientious objector, a Cuban human rights group said.

    “The last three dissidents that were jailed since Wednesday were freed on Sunday” and another two were released Friday and Saturday, Committee for Human Rights and National Reconciliation (CCDHRN) director Elizardo Sanchez told AFP.

    Cuban police arrested and jailed 35 political dissidents in the eastern city of Camaguey, when they were marching in support of Orlando Zapata, whom Amnesty International has declared a prisoner of conscience. He has been in prison since 2003.

    The protesters were briefly jailed, then 30 were released.

    The demonstrators were protesting “the cruel and inhuman treatment” of Zapata. The CCDHRN said it was concerned over Zapata’s health, and called for his unconditional release.

    In its January annual report, the group said that there are 201 political prisoners in Cuba.

    Authorities on the communist island insist there are no political prisoners, but rather US-financed “mercenaries” jailed for threatening Cuban national security.



    Cuba consulting services

  5. Follow up post #5 added on February 10, 2010 by Cubana with 282 total posts

    This article appeared in the Miami Herald in respect of the current condition of Orlando Zapata, in support of whom the protestors were marching:

    “Cuban hunger striker’s condition reportedly worse

    The mother of a Cuban political prisoner on a hunger strike said her son’s condition has worsened and that he has lost considerable weight.

    By JUAN O. TAMAYO
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

    A Cuban political prisoner who has been on a hunger strike since December is ``worsening slowly’’ despite a hospital’s decision to feed him through intravenous tubes, relatives and others said Tuesday.

    Orlando Zapata is ``skin and bones, his stomach is just a hole’’ and he has bedsores on his legs, said his mother, Reina Luisa Tamayo. He has lost so much weight that nurses were not able to get the IV lines into his arms and are using veins on his neck instead.

    ``They are feeding him through the IVs because he continues to refuse to eat on his own, but his situation continues worsening slowly,’’ said human rights activist Elizardo Sanchez Santa Cruz in a telephone interview from Havana.

    BRUTAL CONDITIONS

    Zapata, 42, has been refusing to eat and drinking water only occasionally since December to protest the brutal conditions at his Kilo 7 prison in the eastern province of Camagüey, according to his mother. Prison guards beat him at least three times in the days before he launched the hunger strike, his mother said, and his back was ``tattooed with blows’’ by the time he was transferred recently to the Amalia Simony hospital in Camagüey.

    ``The authorities tell us that he is stable, within the parameters of his grave condition,’’ she told El Nuevo Herald in a phone interview, adding that on Tuesday she was given permission to visit him every day for several hours. She had last seen him on Saturday.

    ``I will continue in this struggle until the seas dry up,’’ she declared to supporters in Miami. ``I hold the Cuban government and the organs of State Security responsible if anything happens to my son, or to one of the brothers who is supporting us.’‘

    ARRESTED IN 2003

    Zapata, a plumber and bricklayer and member of the Alternative Republican Movement National Civic Resistance Committee, was arrested in 2003 amid a harsh crackdown on dissidents, known as Cuba’s Black Spring, that sentenced 75 government critics to long prison terms.

    He was initially charged with contempt, public disorder and ``disobedience,’’ and sentenced to three years.

    But he was later convicted of other acts of defiance while in prison and now stands sentenced to a total of 36 years.

    Amnesty International declared him a ``prisoner of conscience’’ in 2003.

    Zapata’s case has sparked several street protests by government critics, including some in Camagüey last week during which police detained some 35 people for periods ranging from hours to several days.

    Some of the detainees complained they were beaten during the round ups, and others used their cell phones to take photographs inside their crowded holding cells.

    The photos were later sent to supporters abroad.”


  6. Follow up post #6 added on February 13, 2010 by DavidDeming Rodriguez

    If Cuba won’t reform, then the U.S needs to tighten the grip on the Cuban government until they can’t breathe.


  7. Follow up post #7 added on May 04, 2010 by manolito f with 11 total posts

    what usa have to do is go there and get ready all those bad comunism that are runing the country and people to the ground that is the only wait cuba will be free and have better life


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