Post Castro and the Strategic Studies Institute
Posted: 23 November 2007 05:51 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Security requirements for post-transition Cuba
Is Cuba on the verge of political change?

Authors: A. Crowther
Publisher: Strategic Studies Institute of the US Army War College, 2007
Full text of document
This document analyses security requirements that Cuba will face after the death of Fidel Castro and proposes what missions and structure the Cuban security forces might have after a transition.

The author contends that change is inevitable in Cuba. Both Fidel Castro and his brother Raul are ageing. Their passing will trigger either a succession or a transition. With that change, Cuba’s security requirements will change as well, the paper argues.

Key discussion points include:
one aspect of change is the Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias of Cuba (FAR). The FAR currently has a doctrine designed to defend Cuba against attack from the United States
on the part of the United States, the U.S. Government needs to engage the Cuban military. At some point, the United States has had conceptual disagreements with most militaries throughout the hemisphere
with an attitude of engagement rather than confrontation, the United States could help the Cuban military support democracy and eschew human rights violations.

download the PDF http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pdffiles/PUB785.pdf

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Posted: 23 November 2007 09:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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with an attitude of engagement rather than confrontation, the United States could help the Cuban military support democracy and eschew human rights violations.
you mean like they’re supporting the iraqis?

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Posted: 24 November 2007 08:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Interesting article. I read it quick but I get the sense that the author is suggesting that the US pretty much take over the Cuban military so it can teach them how to transition to a new Cuba. Sounds like the same thing we’re doing in Iraq right now, training the military and the polic. How’s that going?

Maybe that’s not a good comparison but I doubt the Cuban military will allow the US military to train them for a new Cuba. I guess I could read it more thoroughly but seems to me the author doesn’t know much about life on the ground in Cuba.

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