Some questions about owning land in Cuba
Posted: 03 August 2006 07:55 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Is it possible for non-Cubans to own houses or property in Cuba?

Are Cuban agricultural lands individual owned or are they some manner of cooperatively?

Where can I go to learned about starting a business in Cuba?

Thank you.

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Posted: 06 August 2006 10:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The quick answer is no . However there are complicated ways around it

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Posted: 07 August 2006 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Tomas,

You will need to go to Cuba, live in Cuba, know people in Cuba and do something beneficial to Cuba before you would have any chance of owning any property in Cuba.

If you want to learn about starting a business in Cuba, see above suggestions.

Good luck and keep us posted if you move forward with your ventures.

Rob

publierh

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Posted: 08 August 2006 04:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Thank you both.

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Posted: 08 August 2006 08:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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suggestions for your inquries:
question #1:
It is practically impossible to own land in Cuba or a business unless you are wealthy.  In that case you wouldn’t even have to be doing something beneficial for Cuba just superficial.  As in many existing cases.  Of course all of this comes down to a philosophical discussion on morality and ethics.  Owning a home in Cuba is difficult even if you are married to a Cuban.  The papers are in their/family names(not yours) and your spouse must have a special visa that makes it possible for he/she to come and go freely. Otherwise they travel Cuba as a foreigner. The only way a ‘foreign’ (this is what Cuban’s call us) can become a resident of Cuba is if their spouse gives up their citizenship outside of Cuba. As you see this is not an option—-for myself anyways.
question#2:
the farm is part of a co-op in the way that the ‘owner’ so-called ‘owns’ the land however he/she must give a part of havest to the govi. Close to 80 %. However there are some perks to living in the country.  For example you can sell a bit to the community, receive soil from the govi and use it to grow vegies rather that endless rows of pineapples; have some pigs and chickens, obtain horses and farm equiptment that you get to fix all of the time…..... reap the benefits of living in the country never having to worry about food or tranqullity.  Vinales holds these traits.
question #3:
if you are not loaded then the only other option is to consider a trip to Cuba. Many.
Good Luck and keep us posted…..
sign,
always on the look out for another version

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Posted: 28 February 2007 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Hi

I am interested in the posts below as I have some questions…

I am a British citizen, my wife is cuban and lives here in London with me. I would like to live in Cuba one day, I’m thinking later on, perhaps in ten years or so. Also I would like to help my mother - in - law, she lives in a very run down, small apartment which, by our standards is squalid. Being fastidious like most cubans I have met she tries very much to keep the place clean, but really she needs a bigger place, in a better neighbourhood.

I am assuming that the only way to provide for my mother - in - law, and for me to enjoy a laid back retirement opportunity, would be to purchase purely on a goodwill basis. I am also thinking that if the property were suitable enough she could register it as a private casa and earn some form of income from it. This I would assume will have to be in her name. If she were to buy a property, financed by myself but in her name, would the Cuban government own 50%.?

Also, on a slightly different tack, my wife has been her since August last year, at the moment the Cuban embassy in London cannot provide the neccesary paperwork clearance for her to be able to visit her mother. They say in fact that it can take anything up to one year. As yet I have not questioned the embassy directly as to the nature of the timescale and when realistically we can expect clearance.

Can anyone provide any advice on these matters?

Many thanks in advance.

Edward

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Posted: 28 February 2007 09:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Edward,

Thanks for your post. Housing in Cuba is very complicated. You need to know your local CDR representative to get any information and then go through layers of bureaucracy in Cuba. I doubt that the Cuban government would allocate decent housing to an older woman unless she is “contributing” to society in some meaningful way like a teacher, scientist or politician.

I certainly don’t have all the facts or answers but I’m guessing that if her daughter left Cuba that she is not in any position to ask for better housing.

The only way to get answers and progress towards your goals would be for you to live in Cuba and work on the paperwork so maybe in ten years you will have a nice place.

That’s my two cents worth. Others may have a different opinion.

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Posted: 28 February 2007 12:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hi

Many thanks for your quick response..I know it is far from straightforward.

I’ll post this out to a wider audience as I’m trying to get a cross section of opinions and advice.

Thanks again

Edward

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Posted: 20 March 2008 11:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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It is practically impossible to own land in Cuba or a business unless you are wealthy.  In that case you wouldn’t even have to be doing something beneficial for Cuba just superficial.  As in many existing cases.

How would somone go about aquiring property if he was wealthy?

Thanks,

David

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Posted: 21 March 2008 10:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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The problem is that no one really “acquires” property in Cuba, they simply have the government’s permission to use it and that permission can be taken away for little reason.

So, if you want to USE property in Cuba, that’s possible. If you want to own it, forget it. The legal system is not set up for ownership as we know it.

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Posted: 21 March 2008 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Ok, thanks for the info. Would said usage rights be transferrable to third parties? And how is the government paid for these usage rights? Is it possible to effectively rent property?

Thanks again.

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Posted: 21 March 2008 12:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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People do swap living quarters in Cuba. Read this house swap article and you’ll have a better idea about housing in Cuba.

Here’s an article from 2005 about investing in real estate in Cuba.

You can be sure the Cuban government gets paid, just like US I suppose.

If you are looking into the market, go stay at a casa particular (private home for rent) then ask about renting longer term and “buying” an apartment. Renting a free standing house will be tougher and you can forget about buying land.

Good luck. Keep us posted.

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