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Posted November 17, 2007 by publisher in Cuban Culture

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Guillermo V. Vidal traveled a long and rocky road before becoming deputy mayor and manager of public works for the city and county of Denver. His memoir, “Boxing for Cuba,” which comes out November 15 from Ghost Road Press, is an account of this journey—a tapestry of his coming of age, a broken family, and the extraordinary collective disorientation of political unrest.

Born in Cuba, Vidal was barely ten years old when the rise of Fidel Castro brought an abrupt and staggering change for him and his family. Though once staunch supporters of La Revolucion, Vidal’s parents soon found they could no longer keep their sons safe in the new face of Castro’s reign, making the difficult decision to send him and his brothers to the U.S. via Operation Peter Pan in 1961.

My story puts a very human face to the difficulties of leaving one’s homeland, security, culture, family and friends and immigrating to a foreign land
The plan was to send the boys to stay with family in Miami until political tremors in Cuba subsided. But to the boy’s surprise, no one was waiting for them. So they were placed in an orphanage in Southern Colorado. After an eventual reunion with his parents, Vidal was raised in Colorado where he and his family struggled and thrived as Cuban Americans.

Vidal returned to Cuba in 2001, where he came to terms with the events of his family’s past.

“My story puts a very human face to the difficulties of leaving one’s homeland, security, culture, family and friends and immigrating to a foreign land,” Vidal said.

Guillermo “Bill” Vidal lives and writes in Denver, Colorado. He is the deputy mayor of Denver.

Contact: Tommie Evans 303.758.7623 or tommie @ ghostroadpress.com
Ghost Road Press
5303 E. Evans Avenue #309
Denver Colorado 8022
303.758.7623
http://www.ghostroadpress.com/catalog.htm

  1. Follow up post #1 added on November 17, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I received a copy several weeks ago and read many pages. I strongly recommend it for readers looking for a “start to finish” look at life in the shoes of a Cuban exile.



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  2. Follow up post #2 added on October 16, 2009 by Ana Marquez

    I also am a cuban refugee that came when I was 8 years old and my brother 13 years old. I also grew up in an orphanage in Denver, Colorado, and lived there for five years until my parents were able to leave Cuba.


  3. Follow up post #3 added on February 10, 2010 by Nicki

    I strongly recommend this book! The author is very honest and kind; and the story is one you will never forget.


  4. Follow up post #4 added on April 19, 2011 by joeyace

    Hey Guillermo….remember me we were in Pueblo together? I have pictures of you and your brothers at the orphanage. So proud of what you have accomplished…love to read your book !!


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