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HavanaJournal.com: Cuban Americans

Fidel Castro’s daughter Alina Fernadez’s life to be made into a feature film

Posted October 16, 2008 by publisher in Cuban Americans.
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Alina Fernandez (Castro’s Daughter) with Bobby Moresco (Crash and Million Dollar Baby)

Fidel Castro’s exiled daughter, Alina Fernandez, is currently on a national tour during Hispanic Heritage Month. Fernandez grew up hidden in the shadows of Castro and the Revolution, and learned at the age of ten that the man who secretly visited her in the odd hours of the night, and who she saw on television everyday, was her father. After expressing her personal differences with Castro, Fernandez eventually became a dissident forbidden to leave Cuba, and later fled the country disguised as a Spanish tourist.

She now lives in exile in Miami, where she hosts her radio talk show, Simplemente Alina (Simply Alina). Her memoir, Castro’s Daughter: An Exile’s Memoir of Cuba, has been published in virtually every foreign country.

As September 15th marked the start of Hispanic Awareness Month, Fernandez embarked on a national tour to lecture in front of student groups at colleges across America, including a long list of lectures during her stops in Kentucky, Tennessee, Minnesota, Illinois , Texas, Michigan, Ohio and Tennessee during the month of October.

Students across the nation will hear her story firsthand before her movie rolls into theaters. The Hollywood Reporter and Variety recently announced that Bobby Moresco, the Oscar winner who co-wrote and produced ‘Crash’, and co-produced ‘Million Dollar Baby,’ will be helming and producing the film, and co-writing the screenplay with Nilo Cruz (Anna in the Tropics), the first Latino to win the Pulitzer Prize for drama. The film, budgeted at twenty million dollars, is expected to go into production next year. John Martinez and Noel Tristan of Austin-based Artists Relations Group (ARG) will be producing with Moresco, in association with The Lamy Group.

For more information about having Alina speak at your local college or about the film, visit her profile on Myspace at http://www.myspace.com/castrosdaughter .

Facebook members can search ‘Castro’s Daughter’ at Facebook films.

For general information or media queries email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Member Comments

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On October 16, 2008, publisher wrote:

John Becker | Northern Michigan University Newspaper

Alina Fernandez, Fidel Castro’s daughter, remembers the drastic changes that took place when her father took over Cuba.

“Everything began with something called revolution. ‘Long live free Cuba’ thundered in the streets,” Fernandez said during her speech in the Great Lakes Rooms on Tuesday, Oct. 14.

Fernandez was four years old when the Cuban Revolution took place in 1959 and said she could recall watching American cartoons and viewed the sudden change in programming from Mickey Mouse to the execution of Castro’s political rivals.

From then on, Fernandez said, there were no more cartoons on the television.

“We had two channels: no American cartoons. ‘Long live free Cuba’ became ‘To the wall!’-executions. You were either with the revolution or against (the country),” she said.

Fernandez said the Cuban Revolution was supposed to resolve social problems, but that no improvements occurred.

“All institutions were systematically destroyed, soon followed freedom of the press and expression,” she said.

Even though Fernandez was not aware that Castro was her father until the age of 10, she said he often visited her mother in the evening.

“(He was) the man who one night stepped out of my TV and into my living room. He offered me a doll disguised as him, a bear with a green hat and beard,” she said

Fernandez would later deny her relation to Castro to Cubans who came seeking aid, hoping that Fernandez could relay a message to the seat of power.

“You must be in real desperation when you’re hoping a child can solve your problems,” she said.

Instead of solving the problems of the people, the revolution only put more people under the scrutiny and control of the government, Fernandez said.

“(The government) controlled the press, mail and phone lines so you couldn’t communicate with other countries until AT&T changed that in 1994. If you tried to do something to improve (your life), you were sent to jail,” she said.

Read the rest of the story HERE.

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On October 18, 2008, Curt wrote:

Alina Fernandez’ book and story are nothing but a pack of lies in order to generate publicity and make lots of money. Anybody who believes her story is foolish and ignorant.

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On October 18, 2008, Curt wrote:

She is disgruntled and bitter because Fidel didn’t pay enough attention to her or give her a high position in the government.

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On October 18, 2008, publisher wrote:

Curt,

Do you have any links to prove these claims? Are you pro-Fidel or anti-Alina?

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On October 19, 2008, Curt wrote:

Read the book by Ann Louise Bardach “Cuba Condidential” It contains very interesting statements by Fidel’s exiled Miami sister Juanita. The woman may not even be Fidel’s daughter. For those of you who are pro Alina, Hold the thought that the apple does not fall far from the tree!

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On October 20, 2008, MiamiCuban wrote:

Left Cuba “disguised as a Spanish tourist?”  She still needed a passport and relevant documents to do this…had to have contacts, etc.  It seems highly unlikely to me that someone inside of Cuba helped her escape.  That means they had to bypass Cuban intelligence and be willing to accept all risk for word leaking out.  Could be….but I don’t know about that one.  Or maybe I’m just too skeptical.