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Posted March 18, 2007 by publisher in Cuba-World Trade

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By William E. Gibson | South Florida Sun-Sentinel

Sen. Mel Martinez introduced a bill on Wednesday that would punish foreign companies and investors who help Cuba drill for oil and natural gas near the shores of Key West.

Martinez, a Republican, and Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat, are trying to fend off another bill also introduced on Wednesday that would allow oil rigs as close as 45 miles from the Florida coast and ease the U.S. embargo so that American companies can drill in Cuban waters.

The Florida senators strongly oppose expanded offshore drilling for fear it would lead to spills that pollute beaches, damage marine life and jeopardize tourism. They also oppose Cuban drilling because oil riches would bolster the Fidel Castro government.

To counter the drilling bill, Martinez introduced one of his own that would deny U.S. travel visas to any foreign person or company who supports Cuba’s oil program. And it would impose unspecified penalties on anyone who invests more than $1 million to develop Cuban oil and gas resources.

“This bill sends a clear message that any attempt to develop Cuba’s oil exploration program will be met with strong sanctions,” Martinez said. “Supporting the Castro regime in the development of its petroleum is detrimental to U.S. policy and our national security.”

The exchange of legislation revives an intense debate over offshore drilling, which appeared to be settled last year with passage of an energy bill that prohibited drilling within 125 miles of Florida shores.

Sens. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, and Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., said last year’s energy bill did not do enough to conserve fuel or expand domestic oil and gas production to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign supplies. The bill they filed on Wednesday calls for tougher fuel-efficiency standards as well as domestic production closer to shore.

While Congress grapples over energy issues, Cuba has contracted with companies from Canada, China and other countries to explore for oil along its north coast near the Straits of Florida. Craig contends that American companies should be allowed to compete for those contracts, partly because they are more likely than foreign drillers to use modern methods that avoid environmental damage.

Craig and Dorgan noted that drilling 45 miles from shore would be out of sight from land. Florida leaders, however, fear that an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico or north of Cuba would flow with the Gulf Stream along the Florida Keys and up the southeast Florida coast.

The legislative exchange appeared to be opening salvos in a new energy debate that may take months to resolve.

  1. Follow up post #1 added on March 18, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    1. “Sen. Mel Martinez introduced a bill on Wednesday that would punish foreign companies and investors who help Cuba drill for oil and natural gas near the shores of Key West.”

    So a US Senator wants to punish a foreign company for doing business in a foreign country. Just who the hell does he think he is?

    This guy is VERY dangerous to the freedom of all Americans.

    2. “Supporting the Castro regime in the development of its petroleum is detrimental to U.S. policy and our national security.”

    Before you know it there will be “proof” of weapons of mass destruction in Cuba.

    This guy would love to see Bay of Pigs 2. VERY dangerous and he should be ashamed of his behavior.



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  2. Follow up post #2 added on March 19, 2007 by J. Perez

    No surprise with regards to Martinez, however, shame on you Sen. Nelson for aligning yourself with such backward thinking. History will one day record and pass judgement on this policy that for the last 42 years has shamed this nation and particulary to those Cuban/Americans that have supported it and profitted from it.


  3. Follow up post #3 added on March 19, 2007 by Cuban American

    Just out of curiosity since I hear this term thrown around quite a bit I would like for someone to point out how we (cuban americans) have profitted from the embargo.  My family owned a private school in Cuba which was later nationalized and taken from us, and we traveled to America to avoid being put in front of a firing squad for our obvious disagreement with the fact that we lost something went spent a lifetime building.  Then we came to this great nation, and started over… never once have I ever recieved a penny that wasn’t in a paycheck from a job that I worked for…. so how are we (cuban americans) profitting from the embargo?  In fact I have spent years sending lots of money to family in Cuba.  Sorry for bringing a personal scenario in, it just kind of gets under my skin when people say we profit from it, because if there are people that profit from it I have never met them, and like I said I have never recieved a penny from the embargo or any aid from the government.


  4. Follow up post #4 added on March 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Cuban American,

    Thank you for your post and I sympathize with your loss. The people who profit from the Embargo are the politicians and organizations that get money from the US government and USAID for useless programs like Radio Marti and Cuban transition studies. Also, they “profit” from the political power they wield with regards to the importance of Florida in Presidential elections.

    Cuban Americans such as yourself are being hurt by the Embargo and it is a 45 year old failed Plan A that has not worked and will not work any time soon.

    I think the Embargo had it’s place maybe all the way up until the early 1990s but once Cuba came out of it’s Special Period and hooked up with Venezuela and China, the US Embargo no longer put ANY pressure on the Cuban government.

    What do you think about the Embargo? Should it be lifted or are you waiting for Fidel or Raul to give in?



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  5. Follow up post #5 added on March 19, 2007 by Pete Chavez

    Dear Cuban American,
    Unfortunately this is our lot in life.  They love to characterize the exile community as a group of ten billionaire families who were just as happy to live in exile as they were to live in Cuba.  Of course as a trade off for the “voluntary” exile they would be fashioning a money making racket out of a very carefully planned out trade embargo against Cuba.  This is the belief that they more or less ascribe to and want for all other Americans to ascribe to as well.  I for one don’t come from one of the ten billionaire families.  I saw my descendants lose in five to ten years time what had taken generations upon generations of my ancestors to build.  Maybe J.Perez came from nothing and this revolution gave him something (although I can’t imagine what, magical thinking?).  I on the other hand, did come from somewhere and this revolution did not give me anything other than the necessity to leave in order to express myself freely in my adoptive land.  But yes, apart from losing freedom in our country and losing our country period, we apparantly have to endure these characterizations (from I don’t know, what could only be a bionic communist)just because we got out of bed one day and decided to live like free men.


  6. Follow up post #6 added on March 19, 2007 by J. Perez

    Cuban American,

    Obviously I was not refering to you since I do not know you. My father too owned a business which was nationalized and lost everything else, houses, automobiles, etc.

    I am sure from your statement that you have never profitted from this ill-conceived policy and you should not take offense, however, there are many that have and they know who they are, it is to them that I was refering to.


  7. Follow up post #7 added on March 19, 2007 by J. Perez

    Mr. Chavez,

    As usual your comments are offensive and ignorant, I suppose that is your lot in life. Please don’t bother responding.


  8. Follow up post #8 added on March 19, 2007 by Pete Chavez

    Flattery will get you no where.


  9. Follow up post #9 added on March 19, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Pete,

    I have to go with J Perez on this one. There was no reason to give him a shot as you did in an earlier comment.

    The topic is how does Senator Martinez think he is trying to penalize foreign companies from doing business in foreign countries.

    That is American bullying and the world has seen enough of that for a while.



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  10. Follow up post #10 added on March 19, 2007 by Pete Chavez

    Publisher,
    He gives a shot every time he mentions Cuban Americans as profiteers of the Embargo.  Maybe he should refine his opinion to specific groups or people.  As
    Cuban American says, it does get under ones skin not mention for me rather waring as he does it all the time.  Plus I did not take a shot at him I stated a speculation as to why he holds the opinions he does (while being a Cuban outside Cuba).  On the other hand he called me names (ignorant to be exact).  And actually as to keeping to the thread I was actually stating to Miami Cuban that he is not alone in the way he feels about these blanket remarks used to describe about seven hundred thousand people.  Honestly Publisher, you are a gringo right?  Then why are you against bullying other nations?  Wouldn’t that get on your nerves if you were living in Canada?


  11. Follow up post #11 added on March 20, 2007 by Cuban American

    Publisher,

    “I think the Embargo had it’s place maybe all the way up until the early 1990s but once Cuba came out of it’s Special Period and hooked up with Venezuela and China, the US Embargo no longer put ANY pressure on the Cuban government. “

    I am going to disagree with this statement.  I think the period of the mid to late 90’s through now, more than ever the embargo has been able to make the greatest impact in its 45 year history.  Prior to the 90’s Cuba had the USSR, which was giving cuba much more financial backing and aid then Venezuela or China does.  It wasn’t till the collapse of the soviet union that we really saw the effect of the embargo on Cuba.  On top of this I don’t feel that if the embargo was lifted we would see any improvements in the lives of the Cuban population.  Most cubans that are able to live halfway decently now do so with the aid of family that lives in exile.  Other than that I don’t see Raul or Fidel giving in, so I would say more like waiting for them to pass on.


  12. Follow up post #12 added on March 20, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    But this time around Cuba has tourism so there is a lot more money coming in. And, with oil from Venezuela and products from China, they don’t need the US as much anymore.

    The Embargo hurts US citizens and businesses and Cuban citizens. It does not hurt the Cuban government. I think it might even help because Fidel would always say things are bad because of “el bloqueo”.

    So, we’ll have to disagree on the benefits and effect of the Embargo.

    Back on topic, the Embargo gives idiots like Martinez the opportunity to take it one more step further by trying to punish foreign companies from doing business in a foreign country.

    This is how I feel and have never heard arguments to change my mind.



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  13. Follow up post #13 added on March 20, 2007 by Cuban American

    Now Publisher, I wouldn’t be so quick to undermine Martinez.  Remember he too like me and 100,000’s of others suffered loss with the regime and had to start all over.  This is not something that is easy to let go, plus I don’t think that lifting the embargo will help the Cuban people as much as some peole tend to think it will.  First off US businesses will have to deal with tons of restrictions because the Castro brothers won’t let any kind of deals go on that they can not have absolute control over.  On top of that the influx of tourism will all go to there pocket, not the peoples.  Remember the state owns practically everything.  So any new travel to the island or trades to the island benifits the Castro regime not the Cuban people.


  14. Follow up post #14 added on March 20, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I can appreciate the hardships of you and other Cubans who left because of Fidel but the fact remains the failed Plan A Embargo has not worked and I don’t think that anyone believes either Castro will change tomorrow, next week, next month or even next year.

    Why has there never been a Plan B? Why would anyone support a 45+ year old failed policy?

    I just have this aching notion that Plan A is just fine for all those who support it and fail to even discuss any Plan B.

    How much funding and power would the exile community and ultimately Miami in general loose without the Embargo in place? The answer of course is LOTS!



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  15. Follow up post #15 added on March 20, 2007 by J. Perez

    Publisher,

    I find it totally bizarre that anyone after 46 years and 10 U.S. presidents later, can not see the absurdity of continuing with the same failed policy, the embargo, aside from being an arrogant and belligerent policy which boils down to economic terrorism, has not achieved its initial goal, that of bringing down Castro and his government.

    A good deal of the Cuban/American community sees the lifting of the embargo as a capitulation to the Castro regime, in fact the opposite is true. I propose that the influx of American capital, peoples and ideas is more likely to bring about change, than the continuation of the same failed policy. Cubans on both sides want change and change will come, make no mistake about that, but I believe the U.S. can hasten that change with a rational policy of engagement.


  16. Follow up post #16 added on March 20, 2007 by Cuban American

    Publisher,

    First lets get this idea that we make money off the embargo out of your head.  I know there are organizations that recieve aid, and there most likely are people that abuse that aid.  However, out of the millions of cubans that live in exile… we are talking about a tiny percentage.  I have no problem with a plan B, as soon as lift the embargo because that is not improving a policy that is removing it completely.  Also, the “miami community”  or the new jersey cubans will not lose any power in a political sense if the embargo is lifted.  That is because of the basic principal of democracy, the people elect who they want.  Cuban Americans will continue to be a majority in south florida whether there is an embargo in place or not, which means that the political power will still be there.  So realistically Cuban Americans don’t lose as much by lifting the embargo as you claim.


  17. Follow up post #17 added on March 20, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Cuban American,

    How many Mitt Romney’s and John McCain’s do you think would go down to Miami to court the Cuban American vote if there was no Embargo? I think less candidates would ride into Miami to pander to the exiles if there was no Fidel.

    May be a harsh way to sum it up but that’s what I mean by losing their power.

    As far as the funding, millions of dollars a year come from all sources into Miami to study Cuba, fund Radio Marti, give supplies to Cuban dissidents etc. I am not even saying these funds are abused, I’m saying they are WASTED.

    No amount of funds thrown at the Embargo is going to make a failed, 45+ year old plan work any better.

    With that said, I appreciate you trying to educate me from your side. We don’t have many pro-Embargo people here so it is refreshing to hear arguments form the other side.

    I hope you don’t get the impression that the Havana Journal is completely pro-Castro or completely anti-Bush because of my position on the Embargo.

    I am trying to educate the average American about US Cuba relations and the sovereign nation of Cuba. I don’t find many/any other sites that do this.

    Thanks for your comments. We may have to agree to disagree on this one.



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  18. Follow up post #18 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    Publisher,

    What I was trying to get across when it comes to the political power aspect of the cuban americans in Miami and other parts is that it will remain.  Whether the embargo stays or goes politicians who are running for any sort of position and want south florida’s vote or Florida’s vote must appeal and cater to the ideas of the people that live there.  That being said, since the majority of the south florida population is hispanic with a major chunk of that being Cuban.  The Cuban Americans will still be able to keep there political power.


  19. Follow up post #19 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    Oh and the reason why there aren’t many pro-embargo people on here is simple.  Most of the people that post aren’t Cuban Americans.  Therefore they are looking at the issue from an outsiders perspective.  Which is a good thing because it allows others to hear arguments from both sides of the fense.  This reason being why I like to read the comments posted on this site.  However, seeing as that the embargo doesn’t really effect anyone who is not Cuban American except for there luxury of vacationing in Cuba I don’t expect them to share our view on the embargo.  That being said I appreciate you making this site to provide a place for all of us to debate the future of Cuba as well as US Cuba policy.


  20. Follow up post #20 added on March 21, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Cuban American,

    You said “However, seeing as that the embargo doesn’t really effect anyone who is not Cuban American except for there luxury of vacationing in Cuba I don’t expect them to share our view on the embargo.”

    restricting all Americans’ freedom to travel and trade with Cuba affects us all.



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  21. Follow up post #21 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    The travel and trade aspect due.  In other words, you don’t get to vacation there or make money off the island through some kind of business therefor you see the embargo as bad.  I don’t blame you for seeing it that way.  But others who owned businesses, property, and investments, had there homes and families taken away may view the embargo differently.


  22. Follow up post #22 added on March 21, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I’m sure they do but

    1. That was DECADES ago.

    2. The Embargo hurts the Cuban people.

    3. The Embargo gives Fidel a crutch and an enemy.

    What’s Plan B? If Embargo supporters were serious about getting rid of Fidel, there would have been a Plan B 40 years ago.

    If the US could import agricultural technology to Cuba, American and Cubans would be better off.

    If you didn’t have the history of losing property in Cuba, would you still be pro-Embargo?



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  23. Follow up post #23 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    It doesn’t matter if it was decades ago, its still the same regime with the same leader.  Imagine the embargo is lifted and US companies start making smart investments into Cuba which begin to generate great profits like eveyone expects them to.  Then Cuba desides wow, that company is making a lot of money here, lets nationalize there factories.  Now that US company which just spent millions on development and construction of a plant just lost everything they put in.  Why?  Because the govermnent didn’t want them there and just needed there money. 

    Another example, lets say they don’t nationalize everything.  So your company is doing great everything is moving along nicely.  You are happy because you are seeing great profits.  Then all of a sudden the govermnent walks into your factory and says we want 60% of all revenue or you will be forced to leave.  Then you tell them, we can’t afford to operate, if we give that much.  Then they say, thats not our problem you figure something out. 

    This isn’t like any other country, they have Totalitarian control.  Whatever they want, whenever they want.  The UN can sanction them and condemn them all they want, and you can demand they do this and that, but in the end they will do whatever the hell they want.


  24. Follow up post #24 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    And don’t say that other international companies have operations there that go smoothly.  Because the truth is the government oversees it all down to the hiring of the employees.  You posted something on here not to long ago, that showed Cuba is third from the last country you should do business with.

    You know what I don’t have any idea for plan B, actually I do.  Cuba should open up there market and let private and corporate ownership in, and im not talking about hte measily 5-7% of business they don’t own now.  I mean real private ownership.  Once they open up to that, then go ahead and lift the embargo.


  25. Follow up post #25 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    The embargo doesn’t hurt the Cuban people, Fidel does.  Open up the economy and everything will go away, he is just to stubborn and wants to control everything.


  26. Follow up post #26 added on March 21, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I hear you. You make valid points but still doesn’t change my opinion.

    I have heard first hand that doing business in Cuba is not like anywhere else but at least US businesses make the choice whether to do business there or not, not the US government.

    My other problem with the Embargo is that a VERY SMALL amount of Americans control its policy and benefit from it. The MAJORITY of Americans are hurt by it.

    I don’t think you and I can agree this one but I think we do agree that we both love Cuba and want to see human rights respected along with personal and business freedoms.

    Espero, mi amigo. Espero.



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  27. Follow up post #27 added on March 21, 2007 by Cuban American

    “I don’t think you and I can agree this one but I think we do agree that we both love Cuba and want to see human rights respected along with personal and business freedoms.”

    I can definately agree with that.  We can only hope that, that day will come soon.


  28. Follow up post #28 added on May 24, 2007 by Anatasio Blanco

    Bills like these are very necessary in order to prevent the regime from hanging onto power in this special period, now that Fidel Castro has taken ill and may even be dead. Overtly bolstering the repressive regime in Cuba by way of assisting in oil production is a direct affront to all those suffering on the island. Bravo to the bill sponsors. For decades, the U.S. has been one of the only countries to stand with the Cuban people and when this long nightmare is over, they will be the first ones we thank.


  29. Follow up post #29 added on May 24, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    “they will be the first ones we thank.”

    WOW.

    You don’t know anything about Cuba. Do you?

    Stick with the 46 year old failed Plan A Embargo, right?

    Restrict Americans’ freedom of trade and travel, right?

    If the Embargo has been around as long as Fidel Castro has been President, don’t you think that maybe, JUST MAYBE, the Embargo isn’t working?



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  30. Follow up post #30 added on May 24, 2007 by Anatasio Blanco

    I suppose having emigrated from Havana 13 years I would have no idea about Cuba, no, you’re right. I find it interesting that foreigners find it so easy to dictate to us. “It’s OK for you little brown Cubans to live in hell . . . it’s your lot in life.” NO, IT IS NOT. Any attempts to further prop Fidel at this VERY critical moment are more proof that much of the world still holds racist, prejudicial views towards our people - the idea that we need a military strongman to keep us in line. Again I say NO! We are human beings and deserve all the freedoms that you yourself most likely enjoy.

    The embargo has not worked as many had hoped - this is of course self evident however, the regime would most surely become even more entrenched if the embargo were to be lifted at such a critical period as these six months of Fidel’s downward health spiral.


  31. Follow up post #31 added on May 24, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    Welcome to the Havana Journal. I am surprised to hear that you are from Havana.

    Hasn’t there always been a “critical” time to justify the Embargo?

    Do you think that without the Embargo, Fidel and Raul could possibly be anymore “entrenched” than they already are now?

    Please share your thoughts. We don’t have many pro-Embargo people around here. I would very much like to know why you think it will work…tomorrow.



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  32. Follow up post #32 added on May 24, 2007 by Anatasio Blanco

    “Hasn’t there always been a “critical” time to justify the Embargo?”

    None more critical than the death, or impending death of Fidel Castro.

    “Do you think that without the Embargo, Fidel and Raul could possibly be anymore “entrenched” than they already are now?”

    Without a doubt. The more businesses entering into shady deals with the regime, profiting off the backs of Cuban men and women, the more dollars go directly into the pockets of party cadres. Why do you think Fidel put the military in charge of the tourism industry? All those tourist dollars buy loyalty from the generals. It was a shrewd move to say the least.

    The embargo has its flaws - among them this inability for Cubans living in exile to visit family members on the island - currently, under the Bush administration - visits have been allowed only for those with a parent or child on the island - other family members are not considered family. This is of course a disgusting notion for Latin Americans, who often share tight family bonds.

    However, preventing big business from bolstering Fidel is imperative. You could have argued otherwise years ago, but now that the head of the hydra is ailing - we must tighten the noose around the corrupt regime entrenched in Havana. It sickens and disgusts me to watch Spanish and Canadian companies building up resorts that regular Cubans are not permitted to enter. It turns my stomach to see foreign companies entering into joint ventures with the Cuban government, paying workers hundreds of dollars a month in wages, with only 20 or so of those dollars actually going into workers’ pockets.  I, like my countrymen, year for a freedom we have not seen in decades. That day is on the horizon. Time to slay the dragon.

    Regards.

    Anatasio


  33. Follow up post #33 added on May 24, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I agree with you on the tourism industry and joint ventures but your hypocrisy is showing.

    Basically, you are saying that you should be able to go to Cuba but not me.

    If the Embargo didn’t work in the Special Period, it is CERTAINLY not going to work when Chavez is giving Cuba oil and the Chinese are giving Cuba buses, appliances and a lot more.

    I am not a Fidel supporter by any means but I am VERY anti-Embargo. The only people it hurts are the American people and the Cuban people.

    There is no argument you can present that will get me to change my mind on the past, current and future failure of the Embargo.



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  34. Follow up post #34 added on May 24, 2007 by Anatasio Blanco

    I don’t need to change your mind and as far as hypocrisy - I see absolutely none. In the past, when I have visited family - I have stayed in their homes, eaten on their tables and done absolutely everything possible to avoid giving one cent to the Castro government. On the other hand, when a tourist heads to the island, he/she plunks down 150/night for a room, 40/night for dinner, etc, etc. Not to mention the sex tourism that is rampant on the island. As Cubans, we’re sick of it all.

    Venezuela is another issue and you’re correct that they are a VERY big problem. Something needs to be done to halt those oils shipments - whether its sabotaging ships, warning captains, etc . . . these folks are complicit in the tyranny holding the island down. There are no innocents when it comes to supporting the enslavement of our family members.

    We should probably agree to disagree.


  35. Follow up post #35 added on May 24, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    “We should probably agree to disagree.”

    No. I’m not letting you off that easy. Not when you want to restrict my rights as an American and make comments like:

    “sabotaging ships” and “there are no innocents”

    You are probably a Posada supporter too.

    You are welcome to post your comments here but I will be honest, I find your mindset very offensive to my rights as an American and your words bordering on advocating terrorism.



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  36. Follow up post #36 added on May 24, 2007 by Anatasio Blanco

    Actually, no, I’m not. Let’s say all the evidence is there (it certainly seems quite strong) that Posada did down that airliner. I support every action he took against Fidel, etc before 1976 however, that one incident makes him nothing more than a murderer. The athletes on the flight had nothing to do with Fidel’s tyranny. Whoever did it - it was a despicable crime perpetrated against our people.

    I do not advocate terrorism - I advocate the disabling of ships in a bid to prevent them from lining Fidel’s pockets with greenbacks - be it by loosening a rudder or disabling navigation systems.

    Do you folks think Cuba is nothing more than a game? Our mothers, brothers and sisters are dying in that hell-hole. Foreign governments continue to turn a blind eye to the atrocious human rights violations on the island. This must stop NOW.


  37. Follow up post #37 added on May 24, 2007 by publisher with 3905 total posts

    I suppose Posada is a good terrorist. Right? That sickens me.

    Supporting a 46 year old failed policy doesn’t sound like a good plan of attack.

    Don’t you think you could do more in Cuba to make changes than standing behind a failed US policy?

    Again, hypocritical to be in the US when you should be in Cuba fighting for what you believe in if you feel so strongly for your countrymen.

    Paya, Beatriz Roque, Roca, Romero etc are there doing what they can.

    Of course I want the Cuban people to be free but all the fighters leave and come to Miami.



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  38. Follow up post #38 added on May 24, 2007 by Anatasio Blanco

    Uh, if you think Posada is a good terrorist - that’s your problem - I never said that.

    “Again, hypocritical to be in the US when you should be in Cuba fighting for what you believe in if you feel so strongly for your countrymen.”

    My friend, don’t assume I haven’t wink

    Anyhow - we’ve certainly struck some nerves here. The bottom line is this: when you’ve witnessed the kind of carnage that has occurred in places like Cuba, Eastern Europe, Chile, etc, you tend to become very unflinching in your views against tyranny. I don’t expect you to understand if you haven’t lived it. Please don’t take that personally, as I don’t mean it in a sarcastic way - I’m being perfectly serious.
    It’s a tough nut to crack and there are as many ideas as there are waves in the ocean. Cubans I suppose, are just a bit more impatient than most.

    Regards,

    Anatasio


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